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Anatomy of a market crash: a market microstructure analysis of the Turkish overnight liquidity crisis

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  • Danielsson, Jon
  • Saltoglu, Burak

Abstract

An order flow model, where the coded identity of the counterparties of every trade is known, hence providing institution level order flow, is applied to both stable and crisis periods in a large and liquid overnight repo market in an emerging market economy. Institution level order flow is much more informative than cross sectionally aggregated order flow. The informativeness of institution level order flow increases with financial instability, with considerable heterogeneity in the yield impact across institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Danielsson, Jon & Saltoglu, Burak, 2003. "Anatomy of a market crash: a market microstructure analysis of the Turkish overnight liquidity crisis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24855, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:24855
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/24855/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kuzubaş, Tolga Umut & Ömercikoğlu, Inci & Saltoğlu, Burak, 2014. "Network centrality measures and systemic risk: An application to the Turkish financial crisis," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 405(C), pages 203-215.
    2. Başak Tanyeri, 2010. "Financial Transparency and Sources of Hidden Capital in Turkish Banks," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 37(1), pages 25-43, February.
    3. Saltoglu, Burak & Yenilmez, Taylan, 2010. "Analyzing Systemic Risk with Financial Networks An Application During a Financial Crash," MPRA Paper 26684, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Nikola Gradojevic, 2007. "A market microstructure analysis of the Canadian dollar depreciation episodes in the 1990s," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(17), pages 1377-1387.
    5. Eross, Andrea & Urquhart, Andrew & Wolfe, Simon, 2016. "Liquidity risk contagion in the interbank market," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 142-155.
    6. Kathy Yuan & Emre Ozdenoren & Itay Goldstein, 2008. "Learning and Complementarities: Implications for Speculative Attacks," 2008 Meeting Papers 276, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Burak Saltoğlu, 2013. "Turkish Banking Sector Current Status and the Future Challenges," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(1), pages 75-86, March.
    8. Raphael H. Solomon, 2004. "When Bad Things Happen to Good Banks: Contagious Bank Runs and Currency Crises," Staff Working Papers 04-18, Bank of Canada.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Order flow model; Financial crisis; Institution identity; Turkey;

    JEL classification:

    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance

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