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Intranational Trade and Regional Tax Rates: A Welfare Analysis on the U.S. Economy


  • Hakan Yilmazkuday

    () (Department of Economics, Florida International University)


This paper analyzes the effects of personal tax rates on macroeconomic variables at regional and national levels through a general equilibrium trade model with private and public sectors, migrating individuals, intermediate inputs and ?nal goods trade, and an analytical solution. The regional model can explain state-level variables in the U.S. almost perfectly. The counterfactuals on the U.S. economy suggest that a nationwide increase in the state-level dividend-income tax rates would be the best option to expand the private sector, tax revenues, and, most importantly, the individual welfare in all states; a nationwide increase in the state-level wage-income tax rates would hurt the economy in all states; property and sales taxes have fewer effects on the U.S. economy. The results are mainly driven by intermediate input trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2011. "Intranational Trade and Regional Tax Rates: A Welfare Analysis on the U.S. Economy," Working Papers 1106, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fiu:wpaper:1106

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Regional Taxes; Trade; Public Sector; Private Sector; the U.S.;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H71 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies
    • R32 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Other Spatial Production and Pricing Analysis


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