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Stock market reaction to financial statement certification by bank holding company CEOs

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  • Beverly Hirtle

Abstract

In 2002, the Securities and Exchange Commission mandated that the chief executive officers of large, publicly traded firms certify the accuracy of their company financial statements. In this paper, I investigate whether CEO certification has had a measurable effect on the stock market valuation of the forty-two bank holding companies subject to the SEC order. I find that these firms experienced a positive average abnormal return of 30 to 60 basis points on the day of certification-a result driven primarily by those BHCs that certified ahead of the SEC's deadline. Characteristics associated with greater opaqueness-BHC asset size, liquid asset holdings, and the extent of "risky" and information-intensive lending-are systematically associated with these certification day abnormal returns. In addition, average returns for not-yet-certifying BHCs were positive, though not statistically significant, on the first two certified, lending weak support to idea that early by some may have signaled investors other likely certify. Overall, results suggest requirement provided relevant information was thus an effective public policy tool, at least banking sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Beverly Hirtle, 2003. "Stock market reaction to financial statement certification by bank holding company CEOs," Staff Reports 170, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:170
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Flannery, Mark J. & Kwan, Simon H. & Nimalendran, M., 2004. "Market evidence on the opaqueness of banking firms' assets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 419-460, March.
    2. Bhattacharya, Utpal & Groznik, Peter & Haslem, Bruce, 2007. "Is CEO certification of earnings numbers value-relevant?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 611-635, December.
    3. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1980. "Measuring security price performance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 205-258, September.
    4. A. Craig MacKinlay, 1997. "Event Studies in Economics and Finance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 13-39, March.
    5. Donald P. Morgan, 2002. "Rating Banks: Risk and Uncertainty in an Opaque Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 874-888, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Flannery, Mark & Hirtle, Beverly & Kovner, Anna, 2017. "Evaluating the information in the federal reserve stress tests," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-18.
    2. Guo Li & Lee Sanning & Sherrill Shaffer, 2009. "Statistical Opacity In The U.S. Banking Industry," CAMA Working Papers 2009-16, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Tri Vi Dang & Gary Gorton & Bengt Holmström & Guillermo Ordoñez, 2017. "Banks as Secret Keepers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1005-1029, April.
    4. Flannery, Mark J. & Kwan, Simon H. & Nimalendran, Mahendrarajah, 2013. "The 2007–2009 financial crisis and bank opaqueness," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 55-84.
    5. Premti, Arjan & Garcia-Feijoo, Luis & Madura, Jeff, 2017. "Information content of analyst recommendations in the banking industry," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 35-47.
    6. Choi, Dong Beom & Eisenbach, Thomas M. & Yorulmazer, Tanju, 2015. "Watering a lemon tree: heterogeneous risk taking and monetary policy transmission," Staff Reports 724, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Nov 2017.
    7. Christina E. Bannier & Patrick Behr & Andre Güttler, 2010. "Rating opaque borrowers: why are unsolicited ratings lower?," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 14(2), pages 263-294.
    8. Michael R King & Steven Ongena & Nikola Tarashev, 2016. "Bank standalone credit ratings," BIS Working Papers 542, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Iannotta, Giuliano & Kwan, Simon H., 2013. "The Impact of Reserves Practices on Bank Opacity," Working Paper Series 2013-35, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, revised 01 Jul 2014.
    10. repec:eee:corfin:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:176-202 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Karlo Kauko, 2016. "Does Opaqueness Make Equity Capital Expensive for Banks?," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, vol. 17(2), pages 203-227, February.
    12. repec:eee:finsta:v:32:y:2017:i:c:p:115-123 is not listed on IDEAS

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