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How Has Empirical Monetary Policy Analysis Changed After the Financial Crisis?

Author

Listed:
  • Francis, Neville

    (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

  • Jackson, Laura E.

    () (Bentley University)

  • Owyang, Michael T.

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

Abstract

In the wake of the Great Recession, the Federal Reserve lowered the federal funds rate (FFR) target essentially to zero and resorted to unconventional monetary policy. With the nominal FFR constrained by the zero lower bound (ZLB) for an extended period, empirical monetary models cannot be estimated as usual. In this paper, we consider whether the standard empirical model of monetary policy can be preserved without breaks. We consider whether alternative policy instruments (e.g., a long-term interest rate) can be considered substitutes for the FFR over the ZLB period. Furthermore, we compare the shadow rates proposed in Krippner [2012] and Wu and Xia [2016] as alternative measures of the stance of monetary policy. We ask whether the shadow rate is a sufficient representation of the policy instrument or if the financial crisis requires other modifications. We find that, when using a dataset that spans both the pre-ZLB and ZLB periods, the shadow rate acts as a fairly good proxy for monetary policy by producing impulse responses of macro indicators similar to what we’d expect based on the post-WWII, non-ZLB benchmark and by displaying stable parameter estimates when compared to this benchmark.

Suggested Citation

  • Francis, Neville & Jackson, Laura E. & Owyang, Michael T., 2014. "How Has Empirical Monetary Policy Analysis Changed After the Financial Crisis?," Working Papers 2014-19, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 10 Oct 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2014-019
    DOI: 10.20955/wp.2014.019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cortes, Kristle Romero & Strahan, Philip E., 2014. "Tracing Out Capital Flows: How Financially Integrated Banks Respond to Natural Disasters," Working Paper 1412, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 01 Oct 2015.
    2. Scott Joslin & Kenneth J. Singleton & Haoxiang Zhu, 2011. "A New Perspective on Gaussian Dynamic Term Structure Models," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(3), pages 926-970.
    3. Black, Fischer, 1995. " Interest Rates as Options," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(5), pages 1371-1376, December.
    4. Jing Cynthia Wu & Fan Dora Xia, 2016. "Measuring the Macroeconomic Impact of Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(2-3), pages 253-291, March.
    5. Jonathan H. Wright, 2011. "What does Monetary Policy do to Long-Term Interest Rates at the Zero Lower Bound?," NBER Working Papers 17154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Viatcheslav Gorovoi & Vadim Linetsky, 2004. "Black's Model of Interest Rates as Options, Eigenfunction Expansions and Japanese Interest Rates," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(1), pages 49-78.
    7. Leo Krippner, 2011. "Modifying Gaussian term structure models when interest rates are near the zero lower bound," CAMA Working Papers 2011-36, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    8. Knut Are Aastveit & Andrea Carriero & Todd E. Clark & Massimiliano Marcellino, 2017. "Have Standard VARS Remained Stable Since the Crisis?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(5), pages 931-951, August.
    9. Friedman, Benjamin Morton, 2010. "Learning From The Crisis: What Can Central Banks Do?," Scholarly Articles 8895183, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Feldkircher, Martin & Gruber, Thomas & Huber, Florian, 2017. "Spreading the word or reducing the term spread? Assessing spillovers from euro area monetary policy," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 5554, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    2. Benjamin K. Johannsen & Elmar Mertens, 2016. "A Time Series Model of Interest Rates With the Effective Lower Bound," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-033, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Halberstadt, Arne & Krippner, Leo, 2016. "The effect of conventional and unconventional euro area monetary policy on macroeconomic variables," Discussion Papers 49/2016, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    4. Milan Damjanović & Igor Masten, 2016. "Shadow short rate and monetary policy in the Euro area," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 43(2), pages 279-298, May.
    5. Yoshihiko Hogen & Ryoichi Okuma, 2018. "The Anchoring of Inflation Expectations in Japan: A Learning-Approach Perspective," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 18-E-8, Bank of Japan.
    6. Goran Jovičić & Davor Kunovac, 2017. "What is Driving Inflation and GDP in a Small European Economy: The Case of Croatia," Working Papers 49, The Croatian National Bank, Croatia.
    7. Martin Feldkircher Author-Email: martin.feldkircher@oenb.at Author-WorkPlace-Name: Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB) & Thomas Gruber Author-Email: thomas.gruber@oenb.at Author-WorkPlace-Name: Oeste, 2017. "Spreading the word or reducing the term spread? Assessing spillovers from euro area monetary policy," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp248, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    8. Geun-Young Kim & Hail Park & Peter Tillmann, 2016. "The Spillover Effects of U.S. Monetary Policy on Emerging Market Economies: Breaks, Asymmetries and Fundamentals," Working Papers 2016-1, Economic Research Institute, Bank of Korea.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    zero lower bound; affine term structure;

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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