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The Regulatory and Monetary Policy Nexus in the Repo Market

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  • Sriya Anbil
  • Zeynep Senyuz

Abstract

We examine the interaction of regulatory reforms and changes in monetary policy in the U.S. repo market. Using a proprietary data set of repo transactions, we find that differences in regional implementation of Basel III capital reforms intensified European dealers' window-dressing by 80%. Money funds eligible to use the Fed's reverse repo (RRP) facility cut their private lending almost by half and instead lent to the Fed when European dealers withdraw, contributing to smooth implementation of Basel III. In a difference-in-differences setting, we show that ineligible funds lent 15% less to European dealers as they find their withdrawal for reporting purposes inconvenient. We find that intermediation through the RRP led to quantity and not pricing adjustments in the market, which is consistent with the RRP facility anchoring market rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Sriya Anbil & Zeynep Senyuz, 2018. "The Regulatory and Monetary Policy Nexus in the Repo Market," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-027, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2018-27
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2018.027
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    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/feds/files/2018027pap.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elizabeth C. Klee & Zeynep Senyuz & Emre Yoldas, 2016. "Effects of Changing Monetary and Regulatory Policy on Overnight Money Markets," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-084, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Jane E. Ihrig & Ellen E. Meade & Gretchen C. Weinbach, 2015. "Rewriting Monetary Policy 101: What's the Fed's Preferred Post-Crisis Approach to Raising Interest Rates?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 177-198, Fall.
    3. Adam Copeland & Antoine Martin & Michael Walker, 2014. "Repo Runs: Evidence from the Tri-Party Repo Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2343-2380, December.
    4. Alyssa G. Anderson & John Kandrac, 2016. "Monetary Policy Implementation and Private Repo Displacement : Evidence from the Overnight Reverse Repurchase Facility," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-096, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    Cited by:

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    3. David B. Cashin & Erin E. Syron Ferris & Elizabeth C. Klee, 2020. "Treasury Safety, Liquidity, and Money Premium Dynamics: Evidence from Recent Debt Limit Impasses," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-008, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Puriya Abbassi & Rajkamal Iyer & José-Luis Peydró & Paul E. Soto, 2020. "Stressed banks? Evidence from the largest-ever supervisory review," Economics Working Papers 1721, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Basel III regulations; Federal Reserve Board and Federal Reserve System; Monetary policy; Repo; Reverse repo facility;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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