IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedgfe/2002-42.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Measuring the cost impact of hospital information systems: 1987-1994

Author

Listed:
  • Ron Borzekowski

Abstract

This study measures the impact of information technology (IT) use on hospital operating costs during the late 1980's and early 1990's. Using a proprietary eight-year panel dataset (1987-1994) that catalogues application-level automation for the complete census of the 3,000 U.S. hospitals with more than 100 beds, this study finds that both financial/administrative and clinical IT systems at the most thoroughly automated hospitals are associated with declining costs three and five years after adoption. At the application level, declining costs are associated with the adoption of some of the newest technologies, including systems designed for cost management, the administration of managed care contracts, and for both financial and clinical decision support. The association of cost declines with lagged IT as well as the cost patterns at the less automated hospitals both provide evidence of learning effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Ron Borzekowski, 2002. "Measuring the cost impact of hospital information systems: 1987-1994," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-42, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2002-42
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2002/200242/200242abs.html
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2002/200242/200242pap.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel P. Kessler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "Do Doctors Practice Defensive Medicine?," NBER Working Papers 5466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    3. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
    4. Jeffrey S. McCullough, 2008. "The adoption of hospital information systems," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 649-664.
    5. Daniel Kessler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "Do Doctors Practice Defensive Medicine?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 353-390.
    6. Per Krusell & Lee E. Ohanian & JosÈ-Victor RÌos-Rull & Giovanni L. Violante, 2000. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: A Macroeconomic Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(5), pages 1029-1054, September.
    7. repec:bin:bpeajo:v:27:y:1996:i:1996-3:p:1-83 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Casey Ichniowski & Kathryn Shaw & Giovanna Prennushi, 1995. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity," NBER Working Papers 5333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Physician agency," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 461-536 Elsevier.
    10. Randall Randall P. Ellis, 1991. "Hospital Cost Function Estimation When Firms May Not Try to Minimize Total Costs," Papers 0029, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    11. Jonathan Gruber & Maria Owings, 1996. "Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 27(1), pages 99-123, Spring.
    12. Vita, Michael G., 1990. "Exploring hospital production relationships with flexible functional forms," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 1-21, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey S. McCullough & Stephen Parente & Robert Town, 2013. "Health Information Technology and Patient Outcomes: The Role of Organizational and Informational Complementarities," NBER Working Papers 18684, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David Dranove & Chris Forman & Avi Goldfarb & Shane Greenstein, 2014. "The Trillion Dollar Conundrum: Complementarities and Health Information Technology," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 239-270, November.
    3. Natalia Zhivan & Mark Diana, 2012. "U.S. hospital efficiency and adoption of health information technology," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 37-47, March.
    4. Jinhyung Lee & Jeffrey S. McCullough & Robert J. Town, 2013. "The impact of health information technology on hospital productivity," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 44(3), pages 545-568, September.
    5. repec:eee:tefoso:v:128:y:2018:i:c:p:84-103 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Felix Köbler & Jens Fähling & Helmut Krcmar & Jan Leimeister, 2010. "IT Governance and Types of IT Decision Makers in German Hospitals," Business & Information Systems Engineering: The International Journal of WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK, Springer;Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI), vol. 2(6), pages 359-370, December.
    7. Spyros Arvanitis & Euripidis N. Loukis, 2014. "Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals," KOF Working papers 14-366, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hospitals - Finance ; Information technology;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2002-42. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Franz Osorio). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.