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Fiscal devaluations

  • Emmanuel Farhi
  • Gita Gopinath
  • Oleg Itskhoki

The authors show that even when the exchange rate cannot be devalued, a small set of conventional fiscal policy instruments can robustly replicate the real allocations attained under a nominal exchange rate devaluation in a standard New Keynesian open economy environment. They perform the analysis under alternative pricing assumptions—producer or local currency pricing along with nominal wage stickiness, under alternative asset market structures, and for anticipated and unanticipated devaluations. There are two types of fiscal policies equivalent to an exchange rate devaluation: one, a uniform increase in the import tariff and export subsidy, and two, an increase in the value-added tax and a uniform reduction in the payroll tax. When the devaluations are anticipated, these policies need to be supplemented with a reduction in the consumption tax and an increase in income taxes. These policies have zero impact on fiscal revenues. In certain cases equivalence requires in addition a partial default on foreign bondholders. They discuss the issues regarding implementation of these policies, in particular in the case of a currency union.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in its series Working Papers with number 12-10.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbwp:12-10
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  1. Carbonnier, Clement, 2007. "Who pays sales taxes? Evidence from French VAT reforms, 1987-1999," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 1219-1229, June.
  2. Michael B. Devereux & Alan Sutherland, 2008. "Country Portfolios in Open Economy Macro Models," NBER Working Papers 14372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  8. repec:ner:dauphi:urn:hdl:123456789/11165 is not listed on IDEAS
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  16. J.E. Boscá & A. Díaz & R. Doménech & J. Ferri & E. Pérez & L. Puch, 2007. "A Rational Expectations Model for Simulation and Policy Evaluation of the Spanish Economy," Working Papers 0706, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.
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  19. Eitan Berglas, 1974. "Devaluation, Monetary Policy, and Border Tax Adjustments," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 7(1), pages 1-11, February.
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