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Environmental Regulation and Industry Location

Author

Listed:
  • Abay Mulatu

    (University of Manchester)

  • Reyer Gerlagh

    (University of Manchester)

  • Dan Rigby

    (University of Manchester)

  • Ada Wossink

    (University of Manchester)

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of environmental regulation on industry location and compares it with other determinants of location such as agricultural, education and R&D country characteristics. The analysis is based on a general empirical trade model that captures the interaction between country and industry characteristics in determining industry location. The Johnson-Neyman technique is used to fully explicate the nature of the conditional interactions. The model is applied to data on 16 manufacturing industries from 13 European countries. The empirical results indicate that the pollution haven effect is present and that the relative strength of such an effect is of about the same magnitude as other determinants of industry location. A significant negative effect on industry location is observed only at relatively high levels of industry pollution intensity.

Suggested Citation

  • Abay Mulatu & Reyer Gerlagh & Dan Rigby & Ada Wossink, 2009. "Environmental Regulation and Industry Location," Working Papers 2009.2, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2009.2
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Edward Manderson & Richard Kneller, 2012. "Environmental Regulations, Outward FDI and Heterogeneous Firms: Are Countries Used as Pollution Havens?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(3), pages 317-352, March.
    2. Franco Ruzzenenti & Andreas Joseph & Elisa Ticci & Pietro Vozzella & Giampaolo Gabbi, 2015. "Interactions between financial and environmental networks in OECD countries," Papers 1501.04992, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2015.
    3. repec:got:cegedp:65 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Millimet, Daniel L., 2013. "Environmental Federalism: A Survey of the Empirical Literature," IZA Discussion Papers 7831, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Mulder, Peter & de Groot, Henri L.F., 2013. "Dutch sectoral energy intensity developments in international perspective, 1987–2005," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 501-512.
    6. Abay Mulatu, 2008. "Weighing the relative importance of environmental regulation for industry location," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0803, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    7. Koetse, Mark J. & de Groot, Henri L.F. & Florax, Raymond J.G.M., 2008. "Capital-energy substitution and shifts in factor demand: A meta-analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2236-2251, September.
    8. Stoschek, Barbara, 2007. "The political economy of environmental regulations and industry compensation," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 65, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    9. Medalla, Erlinda M. & Lazaro, Dorothea C., 2005. "Does Trade Lead to a Race to the Bottom in Environmental Standards? Another Look at the Issues," Discussion Papers DP 2005-23, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    10. Sunghoon Chung, 2012. "Environmental Regulation and the Pattern of Outward FDI: An Empirical Assessment of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis," Departmental Working Papers 1203, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pollution Haven Hypothesis; Comparative Advantage; Industry Location;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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