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Type I and Type II Fractional Brownian Motions: a Reconsideration

Author

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  • James Davidson

    (Department of Economics, University of Exeter)

  • Nigar Hashimzade

    (University of Reading)

Abstract

The so-called type I and type II fractional Brownian motions are limit distributions associated with the fractional integration model in which pre-sample shocks are either included in the lag structure, or suppressed. There can be substantial differences between the distributions of these two processes and of functionals derived from them, so that it becomes an important issue to decide which model to use as a basis for inference. Alternative methods for simulating the type I case are contrasted, and for models close to the nonstationarity boundary, truncating infinite sums is shown to result in a significant distortion of the distribution. A simple simulation method that overcomes this problem is described and implemented. The approach also has implications for the estimation of type I ARFIMA models, and a new conditional ML estimator is proposed, using the annual Nile minima series for illustration.

Suggested Citation

  • James Davidson & Nigar Hashimzade, 2008. "Type I and Type II Fractional Brownian Motions: a Reconsideration," Discussion Papers 0816, Exeter University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:exe:wpaper:0816
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    File URL: http://people.exeter.ac.uk/cc371/RePEc/dpapers/DP0816.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sowell, Fallaw, 1992. "Maximum likelihood estimation of stationary univariate fractionally integrated time series models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1-3), pages 165-188.
    2. David Byers & James Davidson & David Peel, 2002. "Modelling political popularity: a correction," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(1), pages 187-189.
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    6. Haldrup, Niels & Nielsen, Morten Orregaard, 2007. "Estimation of fractional integration in the presence of data noise," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 3100-3114, March.
    7. Coakley, Jerry & Dollery, Jian & Kellard, Neil, 2008. "The role of long memory in hedging effectiveness," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 3075-3082, February.
    8. Juan J. Dolado & Jesus Gonzalo & Laura Mayoral, 2002. "A Fractional Dickey-Fuller Test for Unit Roots," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(5), pages 1963-2006, September.
    9. David Byers & James Davidson & David Peel, 1997. "Modelling Political Popularity: an Analysis of Long-range Dependence in Opinion Poll Series," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 160(3), pages 471-490.
    10. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Gil-Alana, Luis A., 2008. "Modelling the US, UK and Japanese unemployment rates: Fractional integration and structural breaks," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 52(11), pages 4998-5013, July.
    11. Davidson, James & Sibbertsen, Philipp, 2005. "Generating schemes for long memory processes: regimes, aggregation and linearity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 128(2), pages 253-282, October.
    12. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Diebold, Francis X., 1994. "On maximum likelihood estimation of the differencing parameter of fractionally-integrated noise with unknown mean," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 301-316, June.
    13. Davidson, James, 2006. "Alternative bootstrap procedures for testing cointegration in fractionally integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 133(2), pages 741-777, August.
    14. Davidson, James & Hashimzade, Nigar, 2008. "Alternative Frequency And Time Domain Versions Of Fractional Brownian Motion," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(01), pages 256-293, February.
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    16. Luis A. Gil-Alana & Guglielmo M. Caporale, 2008. "Modelling the US, the UK and Japanese unemployment rates. Fractional integrationand structural breaks," Faculty Working Papers 11/08, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
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    Cited by:

    1. Caporin, Massimiliano & Ranaldo, Angelo & Santucci de Magistris, Paolo, 2013. "On the predictability of stock prices: A case for high and low prices," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5132-5146.
    2. Ergemen, Yunus Emre & Haldrup, Niels & Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir, 2016. "Common long-range dependence in a panel of hourly Nord Pool electricity prices and loads," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 79-96.
    3. Frank S. Nielsen, 2011. "Local Whittle estimation of multi‐variate fractionally integrated processes," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 317-335, May.
    4. Okou, Cédric & Jacquier, Éric, 2016. "Horizon effect in the term structure of long-run risk-return trade-offs," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 445-466.
    5. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Gil-Alana, Luis A., 2017. "Persistence and cycles in the us federal funds rate," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1-8.
    6. James Davidson & Dooruj Rambaccussing, 2015. "A test of the long memory hypothesis based on self-similarity," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 286, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.

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