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Modelling political popularity: a correction

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  • David Byers
  • James Davidson
  • David Peel

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  • David Byers & James Davidson & David Peel, 2002. "Modelling political popularity: a correction," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(1), pages 187-189.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:165:y:2002:i:1:p:187-189
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    1. Eileen Crimmins & Mark Hayward & Yasuhiko Saito, 1994. "Changing mortality and morbidity rates and the health status and life expectancy of the older population," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(1), pages 159-175, February.
    2. Alfonso Miranda & Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, 2005. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Endogenous Switching And Sample Selection Models for Binary, Count, And Ordinal Variables," Keele Economics Research Papers KERP 2005/14, Centre for Economic Research, Keele University.
    3. Crossley, Thomas F. & Kennedy, Steven, 2002. "The reliability of self-assessed health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 643-658, July.
    4. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2005. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 39-54.
    5. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Wagstaff, Adam & van der Burg, Hattem & Christiansen, Terkel & De Graeve, Diana & Duchesne, Inge & Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Gerfin, Michael & Geurts, Jose & Gross, Lorna, 2000. "Equity in the delivery of health care in Europe and the US," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 553-583, September.
    6. Deaton, Angus S & Paxson, Christina H, 1998. "Aging and Inequality in Income and Health," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 248-253, May.
    7. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "The dynamics of health in the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 473-503.
    8. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    9. Cristina Hernandez-Quevedo & Andrew M Jones & Nigel Rice, "undated". "Reporting Bias and Heterogeneity in Self-Assessed Health. Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Discussion Papers 04/18, Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. Richard Stone & D. G. Champernowne & J. E. Meade, 1942. "The Precision of National Income Estimates," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 111-125.
    11. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "Simulation-based inference in dynamic panel probit models: An application to health," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 49-77, January.
    12. Peter Congdon, 2006. "A model for geographical variation in health and total life expectancy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(9), pages 157-178, March.
    13. Andrew M. Jones & Xander Koolman & Nigel Rice, 2006. "Health-related non-response in the British Household Panel Survey and European Community Household Panel: using inverse-probability-weighted estimators in non-linear models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(3), pages 543-569.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eisinga, Rob & Franses, Philip Hans & Ooms, Marius, 1999. "Forecasting long memory left-right political orientations," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 185-199, April.
    2. John Byers & David Peel & Dennis Thomas, 2007. "Habit, aggregation and long memory: evidence from television audience data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 321-327.
    3. Davidson, James & Hashimzade, Nigar, 2009. "Type I and type II fractional Brownian motions: A reconsideration," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 53(6), pages 2089-2106, April.
    4. David Byers & James Davidson & David Peel, 2007. "The long memory model of political support: some further results," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(20), pages 2547-2552.
    5. Morten Ørregaard Nielsen & Sergei S. Shibaev, 2015. "Forecasting daily political opinion polls using the fractionally cointegrated VAR model," Working Papers 1340, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

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