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Smoking, Obesity, and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Japan

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  • MORIKAWA Masayuki

Abstract

This study, using original survey data, presents evidence from Japan of the relationship between smoking and obesity on the one hand, and labor market outcomes and subjective well-being on the other hand. According to the results, first, after accounting for various individual characteristics, wages of both male and female smokers are significantly higher than those of non-smokers. This unexpected finding differs from those of past studies and general perception. In addition, the labor participation rate of smokers is higher than that of non-smokers. Second, there is a wage penalty for obesity only among male workers. This is also an unexpected finding, as many past studies have detected wage discounts for obese females. Third, smoking and obesity are associated with low life satisfaction and job satisfaction among females, but these relationships are weak among males.

Suggested Citation

  • MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2018. "Smoking, Obesity, and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Japan," Discussion papers 18023, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:18023
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