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Carbon Pricing, Technology Transition, and Skill-Based Development

Author

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  • Kirill Borissov

    () (European University at Saint Petersburg, Russia)

  • Lucas Bretschger

    () (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

Abstract

We derive the optimal contributions to global climate policy when countries differ with respect to income level and pollution intensity. Countries's growth rates are determined endogenously, and abatement effciency is improved by technical progress. We show that country heterogeneity has a crucial impact on optimal policy contributions: more developed countries have to make a larger effort while less developed countries are allowed to graduate under a less stringent environmental regime. The optimal allocation of pollution per- mits depends on international trade. In the absence of international permit trade, more developed countries should receive more permits than the less developed countries but permit prices are higher in the rich countries. With international permit trade, more developed countries receive less permits than the less developed. When global distribution of physical capital is uneven and the aggregate pollution ceiling is low, poor countries receive all the permits and incomes do not converge, even with free trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Kirill Borissov & Lucas Bretschger, 2018. "Carbon Pricing, Technology Transition, and Skill-Based Development," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 18/297, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:eth:wpswif:18/297
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    Cited by:

    1. Ara Jo, 2020. "The Elasticity of Substitution between Clean and Dirty Energy with Technological Bias," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 20/344, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    2. Lucas Bretschger & Karen Pittel, 2019. "Twenty Key Questions in Environmental and Resource Economics," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 19/328, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    3. Shang, Tiancheng & Yang, Lan & Liu, Peihong & Shang, Kaiti & Zhang, Yan, 2020. "Financing mode of energy performance contracting projects with carbon emissions reduction potential and carbon emissions ratings," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 144(C).
    4. Florian Böser & Chiara Colesanti Senni, 2020. "Emission-based Interest Rates and the Transition to a Low-carbon Economy," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 20/337, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate policy; growth; abatement efficiency; policy convergence;

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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