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Fiscal Policy Design in Low-Income Countries

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  • Christopher S. Adam
  • David L. Bevan

Abstract

For many low-income countries, there has been an extended period in which fiscal policy was not a choice, or was a choice made by authorities external to the country. For a number of them, this situation is now changing. Their own success in stabilising the economy, coupled with a shift in the stance of the international community (most notably the IMF), has placed fiscal choices back on the domestic agenda. However, the scope for choice maybe heavily circumscribed by the legacy of past fiscal laxity. [Discussion Paper No. 2001/67]

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  • Christopher S. Adam & David L. Bevan, 2010. "Fiscal Policy Design in Low-Income Countries," Working Papers id:3162, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3162
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dambisa Moyo & David Stasavage, 1999. "Are cash budgets a cure for excess fiscal deficits (and at what cost)?," CSAE Working Paper Series 1999-11, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Atish Ghosh & Steven Phillips, 1998. "Warning: Inflation May Be Harmful to Your Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 672-710, December.
    3. Fozzard, Adrian & Foster, Mick, 2001. "Changing Approaches to Public Expenditure Management in Low-income Aid Dependent Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 107, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. David Stasavage and Dambisa Moyo, 1999. "Are cash budgets a cure for excess fiscal deficits (and at what cost)?," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1999-11, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Buffie, Edward & Adam, Christopher & O'Connell, Stephen & Pattillo, Catherine, 2008. "Riding the wave: Monetary responses to aid surges in low-income countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(8), pages 1378-1395, November.
    2. Goran Hyden, 2005. "Working Paper 80 - Making Public Sector Management Work for Africa: Back to the Drawing - Board," Working Paper Series 215, African Development Bank.
    3. Benedict J. Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Emanuele Baldacci & Carlos Mulas-Granados, 2002. "Expenditure Composition, Fiscal Adjustment, and Growth in Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/77, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Heller, Peter S. & Katz, Menachem & Debrun, Xavier & Thomas, Theo & Koranchelian, Taline & Adenauer, Isabell, 2006. "Making Fiscal Space Happen! Managing Fiscal Policy in a World of Scaled-Up Aid," WIDER Working Paper Series 125, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Annalisa Fedelino & Alina Kudina, 2003. "Fiscal Sustainability in African HIPC Countries; A Policy Dilemma?," IMF Working Papers 03/187, International Monetary Fund.
    6. AfDB AfDB, 2005. "Working Paper 80 - Making Public Sector Management Work for Africa: Back to the Drawing - Board," Working Paper Series 2214, African Development Bank.

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    Keywords

    fiscal policy; macro-economic stabilization; sub-Saharan Africa;

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