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Residential mobility, neighbourhood quality and life-course events

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  • Rabe, Birgitta
  • Taylor, Mark P.

Abstract

Neighbourhood characteristics affect the social and economic opportunities of their residents. While a number of studies have analysed housing adjustments at different life stages, little is known about neighbourhood quality adjustments. Based on a model of optimal housing consumption we analyse the determinants of residential mobility and the neighbourhood quality adjustments made by those who move, drawing on data from the British Household Panel Survey and Indices of Multiple Deprivation. We measure neighbourhood quality both subjectively and objectively and find that not all life-course events that trigger moves lead to neighbourhood quality adjustments. Single people are negatively affected by leaving the parental home and couples by a husband s unemployment. Couples having a new baby move into better neighbourhoods.

Suggested Citation

  • Rabe, Birgitta & Taylor, Mark P., 2009. "Residential mobility, neighbourhood quality and life-course events," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2009-28
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2009-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sadig, Husam, 2014. "Unknown eligibility whilst weighting for non-response: the puzzle of who has died and who is still alive?," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-35, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Alexandrina-Ioana Scorbureanu & IOn Scorbureanu, 2012. "Neighborhood quality determinants. Empirical evidence from the American Housing Survey," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 3(1), pages 153-161, July.

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