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Segregation, Choice Based Letting and Social Housing: How Housing Policy Can Affect the Segregation Process

Author

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  • van Ham, Maarten

    () (Delft University of Technology)

  • Manley, David

    () (University of Bristol)

Abstract

In this chapter we investigate the process of ethnic minority segregation in English social housing. Successive governments have expressed a commitment to the contradictory aims of providing greater choice – through the introduction of choice based letting – for households accessing an increasingly marginalised social housing sector whilst also expressing a determination to create more mixed communities and neighbourhoods. We consider the concept of choice in the context of a heavily residualised social housing sector, arguing that, for social housing tenants at least, the concept of real choice is a misnomer. We draw on research that has utilised unique administrative data and analysed the moves of all entrants into and movers within the social renting sector over a ten year period in England. The conclusion is that the introduction of choice based letting has influenced the residential outcomes of ethnic minorities and resulted in highly structured neighbourhood sorting that has segregated minority populations into the least desirable neighbourhoods of English cities.

Suggested Citation

  • van Ham, Maarten & Manley, David, 2012. "Segregation, Choice Based Letting and Social Housing: How Housing Policy Can Affect the Segregation Process," IZA Discussion Papers 6372, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6372
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maarten van Ham & Peteke Feijten, 2008. "Who wants to leave the neighbourhood? The effect of being different from the neighbourhood population on wishes to move," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 40(5), pages 1151-1170, May.
    2. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R. & Scafidi, Benjamin, 2002. "Black Self-Segregation as a Cause of Housing Segregation: Evidence from the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 366-390, March.
    3. Yannis M. Ioannides & Jeffrey E. Zabel, 2003. "Neighbourhood effects and housing demand," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(5), pages 563-584.
    4. Ron Johnston & Simon Burgess & Deborah Wilson & Richard Harris, 2006. "School and Residential Ethnic Segregation: An Analysis of Variations across England's Local Education Authorities," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(9), pages 973-990.
    5. Åsa Bråmå, 2006. "'White Flight'? The Production and Reproduction of Immigrant Concentration Areas in Swedish Cities, 1990-2000," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 43(7), pages 1127-1146, June.
    6. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 488-493, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    UK; social housing; segregation; choice based letting; housing policy;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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