IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ema/worpap/2017-01.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Some microeconometric evidence on the relationship between health and income

Author

Listed:
  • Amélie Adeline
  • Eric Delattre

    () (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, THEMA)

Abstract

Income-related health inequalities have gained much attention. Using the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), this paper tests three hypotheses concerning the link between health, income and income inequalities. The Absolute Income Hypothesis states that income has a positive and concave effect on health. The second hypothesis, the strong version of Income Inequality Hypothesis, states that income inequalities affect all members in a society equivalently. The last one is the weak version of Income Inequality Hypothesis which assumes that income inequalities may hurt the health of only the least well off in a society. Results show strong evidence for the three hypotheses on the self-perceived health status, a subjective measure, using a set of income inequalities indexes and robust methods to consider the subjective nature of this health measure.

Suggested Citation

  • Amélie Adeline & Eric Delattre, 2017. "Some microeconometric evidence on the relationship between health and income," THEMA Working Papers 2017-01, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  • Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2017-01
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://thema.u-cergy.fr/IMG/pdf/2017-01.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Vincent Hildebrand & Philippe Kerm, 2009. "Income inequality and self-rated health status: Evidence from the european community household panel," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(4), pages 805-825, November.
    2. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
    3. Carrieri, V. & Jones, A.M., 2015. "The Income-Health Relationship “Beyond the Mean†: New Evidence from Biomarkers," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Andrew M. Jones & Stefanie Schurer, 2011. "How does heterogeneity shape the socioeconomic gradient in health satisfaction?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 549-579, June.
    5. David Cutler & Angus Deaton & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2006. "The Determinants of Mortality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(3), pages 97-120, Summer.
    6. Li, Hongbin & Zhu, Yi, 2006. "Income, income inequality, and health: Evidence from China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 668-693, December.
    7. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    8. Eddy van Doorslaer & Xander Koolman & Andrew M. Jones, 2004. "Explaining income-related inequalities in doctor utilisation in Europe," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 629-647.
    9. Theodossiou, I. & Zangelidis, A., 2009. "The social gradient in health: The effect of absolute income and subjective social status assessment on the individual's health in Europe," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 229-237, July.
    10. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Moshe Buchinsky & Hiu Man Chan & Sofia Cheidvasser & John Rust, 2004. "How large is the bias in self-reported disability?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 649-670.
    11. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1997:87:9:1491-1498_6 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2003. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 207-223, January.
    13. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1998:88:7:1074-1080_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Jennifer M. Mellor & Jeffrey Milyo, 2002. "Income Inequality and Health Status in the United States: Evidence from the Current Population Survey," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(3), pages 510-539.
    15. Magnus Lindelow, 2006. "Sometimes more equal than others: how health inequalities depend on the choice of welfare indicator," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(3), pages 263-279.
    16. Lindeboom, Maarten & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2004. "Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1083-1099, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health inequalities; income inequalities; self-reported health; Europe.;

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2017-01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Stefania Marcassa). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/themafr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.