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Spatial determinants of productivity: analysis for the regions of Great Britain

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  • Rice, Patricia
  • Venables, Tony

Abstract

This paper uses NUTS3 sub-regional data for Great Britain to analyse the determinants of spatial variations in income and productivity. We decompose the spatial variation of earnings into a productivity effect and an occupational composition effect. For the former (but not the latter) we find a robust relationship with proximity to economic mass, suggesting that doubling the population of working age proximate to an area is associated with a 3.5% increase in productivity in the area. We measure proximity by travel time, and show that effects decline steeply with time, ceasing to be important beyond approximately 80 minutes.

Suggested Citation

  • Rice, Patricia & Venables, Tony, 2004. "Spatial determinants of productivity: analysis for the regions of Great Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2040, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:2040
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    regional disparities; productivity; clustering;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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