IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Gradual Catch Up and Enduring Leadership in the Global Wine Industry

  • Andrea Morrison
  • Roberta Rabellotti

What has happened in the global wine industry is extremely interesting from a catch up point of view because the latecomers in the international market have radically changed how wine is produced, sold and consumed. Until the end of the 1980s the international market for wine was without a doubt dominated by European countries. But since the beginning of the 1990s this supremacy has started to come under attack due to the spectacular performance of new global leaders, which include affluent nations such as USA and Australia, and emerging economies, such as Argentina, Chile and South Africa. In this paper we aim at investigating the catch up cycle in the wine industry through a detailed analysis of export data. This analysis allows addressing issues related with the increasing share in the global market of countries from New World and relative decline of the Old World and the changes within these two groups. Having identified the successive stages in the catch up cycle, we focus on the successive windows opportunities, which have opened up in the wine sector. Finally, we investigate how the opening of these windows of opportunities in the market have generated important changes in the techno-economic paradigm and in the institutional settings of wine production initially mainly in the New World and then also among the Old World producing countries.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1404.pdf
File Function: Version February 2014
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1404.

as
in new window

Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2014
Date of revision: Feb 2014
Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1404
Contact details of provider: Postal: Secretariaat kamer 635, P.O.Box 80.115, 3508 TC Utrecht
Phone: 030-2531399
Fax: 030-2532037
Web page: http://econ.geo.uu.nl
More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Franco Malerba & Richard Nelson, 2011. "Learning and catching up in different sectoral systems: evidence from six industries," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 1645-1675, December.
  2. Giuliani, Elisa & Bell, Martin, 2005. "The micro-determinants of meso-level learning and innovation: evidence from a Chilean wine cluster," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 47-68, February.
  3. Lee, Keun & Lim, Chaisung, 2001. "Technological regimes, catching-up and leapfrogging: findings from the Korean industries," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 459-483, March.
  4. Lorenzo Cassi & Andrea Morrison & Roberta Rabellotti, 2014. "Proximity and scientific collaboration: Evidence from the global wine industry," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1405, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Feb 2014.
  5. Michael B. Beverland, 2005. "Crafting Brand Authenticity: The Case of Luxury Wines," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(5), pages 1003-1029, 07.
  6. Lucia Cusmano & Andrea Morrison & Roberta Rabellotti, 2009. "Catching-up Trajectories in the Wine Sector: A Comparative Study on Chile, Italy and South Africa," KITeS Working Papers 007, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Mar 2009.
  7. Malerba, Franco, 2002. "Sectoral systems of innovation and production," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 247-264, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1404. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.