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Fertility and Income

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  • T. Paul Schultz

    () (Economic Growth Center, Yale University)

Abstract

There is an inverse association between income per adult and fertility among countries, and across households this inverse association is also often observed. Many studies find fertility is lower among better educated women and is often higher among women whose families own more land and assets. What do we know about the social consequences of events and policies that change fertility, if they are independent of parent preferences for children or the economic conditions which account for much of the variation in parent lifetime fertility? These effects of exogenous fertility change on the health and welfare of children can are assessed from Kenyan household survey data by analysis of the consequences of twins, and the effect of avoiding unanticipated fertility appears to have a larger beneficial effect on the body mass index or health status of children in the family than would be expected due to variation in fertility which is accounted for by parent education and household land.

Suggested Citation

  • T. Paul Schultz, 2005. "Fertility and Income," Working Papers 925, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:925
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    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp925.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & H. Gregg Lewis, 1974. "Interaction between Quantity and Quality of Children," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 81-90 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Theodore W. Schultz, 1974. "Fertility and Economic Values," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 3-22 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mohammed Sabihuddin Butt & Haroon Jamal, 1993. "Determinants of Marital Fertility in Pakistan: An Application of the "Synthesis Framework"," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 199-220.
    2. Paweenawat, Sasiwimon Warunsiri & McNown, Robert, 2014. "The determinants of income inequality in Thailand: A synthetic cohort analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31, pages 10-21.
    3. Aassve, Arnstein & Kedir, Abbi & Weldegebriel, Habtu Tadesse, 2006. "State dependence and causal feedback of poverty and fertility in Ethiopia," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-30, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Hassan Zaky & Rebeca Wong & Ismail Sirageldin, 1993. "Testing for the Onset of Fertility Decline: An Illustration with the Case of Egypt," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 32(3), pages 285-301.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sources of Fertility Decline; Twins; Child Health; Kenya;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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