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What makes a citrus farmer go organic? Empirical evidence from Spanish citrus farming

Author

Listed:
  • Mercedes Beltrán-Esteve

    (Universidad de Valencia)

  • Andrés J. Picazo-Tadeo

    (Universidad de Valencia)

  • Ernest Reig-Martínez

    (Universidad de Valencia)

Abstract

Organic farming is increasing its share of total world food output and receiving growing support from policymakers concerned with agricultural sustainability issues. This paper studies the characteristics of citrus farmers in the Spanish region of Valencia that affect their probability of becoming organic farmers. A fair understanding of these characteristics may help policymakers improve the design of agricultural policies aimed at supporting organic citrus practices. As regards the methodology, a probit model is estimated with information of a sample of conventional and organic citrus farmers obtained from a survey specifically designed for the purpose of this research. Our main finding is that university education and agricultural professional training both increase the probability of becoming an organic farmer. Conversely, older farmers, farmers selling their production to foreign markets and those with farms of greater size and/or managing family farms are less likely to adopt organic citrus farming. The main policy implication is that, in order to support organic citrus production, more attention needs to be paid to improve farmersÕ technical training and education concerning organic farming.

Suggested Citation

  • Mercedes Beltrán-Esteve & Andrés J. Picazo-Tadeo & Ernest Reig-Martínez, 2012. "What makes a citrus farmer go organic? Empirical evidence from Spanish citrus farming," Working Papers 1205, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
  • Handle: RePEc:eec:wpaper:1205
    as

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    File URL: ftp://147.156.210.157/RePEc/pdf/eec_1205.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Mercedes Beltrán & Ernest Reig, 2014. "Comparing conventional and organic citrus grower efficiency in Spain," Working Papers 1406, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
    2. Juan Torres & Diego L. Valera & Luis J. Belmonte & Carlos Herrero-Sánchez, 2016. "Economic and Social Sustainability through Organic Agriculture: Study of the Restructuring of the Citrus Sector in the “ Bajo Andarax ” District (Spain)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-14, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Citrus farming; organic versus conventional production; probit estimation; education and professional training; Spain;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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