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Creative Destruction Cycles: Schumpeterian Growth in an Estimated DSGE Model

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  • Marco Luca Pinchetti

Abstract

In this paper I incorporate a Schumpeterian mechanism of creative destruction in a standard DSGE framework. In the model, a sector of forward-looking profit maximizing innovators determines the economy’s TFP growth rate. I estimate the model with Bayesian methods, and show that models featuring an endogenous TFP channel can empirically outperform models that exhibit standard, exogenous productivity dynamics. The paper provides a comprehensive comparative assessment of the impact of the endogenous TFP channel in an estimated fully-fledged DSGE model. The variance decomposition analysis shows that endogenous TFP is a powerful channel of transmission of adverse shocks throughout the business cycle. The estimates suggest that the 35% of the productivity growth rate fluctuations had endogenous origins during the Great Recession.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Luca Pinchetti, 2017. "Creative Destruction Cycles: Schumpeterian Growth in an Estimated DSGE Model," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2017-04, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/250791
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Luca Fornaro & Gianluca Benigno, 2015. "Stagnation Traps," 2015 Meeting Papers 810, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Sungbae An & Frank Schorfheide, 2007. "Bayesian Analysis of DSGE Models—Rejoinder," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2-4), pages 211-219.
    3. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    4. Jing Cynthia Wu & Fan Dora Xia, 2016. "Measuring the Macroeconomic Impact of Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(2-3), pages 253-291, March.
    5. Cozzi, Guido & Pataracchia, Beatrice & Pfeiffer, Philipp & Marco, Ratto, 2017. "How much Keynes and how much Schumpeter? An Estimated Macromodel of the US Economy," Working Papers 2017-01, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
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    8. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE model; endogenous TFP; schumpeterian growth; post-crisis slump;

    JEL classification:

    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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