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Is There Gender Bias Among Voters ?Evidence from the Chilean Congressional Elections

Listed author(s):
  • Francisco Pino

I exploit the unique institution of gender-segregated voting booths in Chile, allowingthe use of actual voting data, instead of self-reported surveys, to test for genderbias among voters. Overall I find evidence of a small but significant negative genderbias: women overall are less likely than men to vote for female candidates. The effect ismainly driven by center-right voters. Selection, candidates’ quality and districts’ characteristicsdo not explain away the results. This evidence does not question whetherfemale leaders have an effect on economic outcomes, but rather the mechanism throughwhich this effect takes place.

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/179102/1/2014-53-PINO-istheregender.pdf
File Function: 2014-53-PINO-istheregender
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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number ECARES 2014-53.

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Length: 45 p.
Date of creation: Dec 2014
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/179102
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