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General Equilibrium Analysis of DDA Trade Liberalization : Assessment of Alternative Scenarios


  • Nakgyoon Choi

    (Korea Institute for International Economic Policy)


This paper aims to implement the simulation studies using a CGE approach to identify ideas on how to finalize the DDA negotiations by making some mutual concessions and deal with contentious issues yet to be agreed. The simulation results of this paper, which lay between those of the previous literature, indicate that the DDA negotiations will boost the global economy to a substantial degree. It reveals that the world GDP effects will amount to US$ 49.9~186.2 billion (0.12~0.45%) and the wel- fare gain will amount to US$ 49.7~157.7 billion. The GDP growth effects are mainly due to effects of trade expansion, which amount to US$ 265.3~382.0 billion. The simulation result also indicates that developed countries need to consider positively the arguments of developing countries on the controversial issues related to agriculture. In return for the concessions by the developed countries, the developing countries will likely accept further discussions related to the sectoral proposals and services liberalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Nakgyoon Choi, 2010. "General Equilibrium Analysis of DDA Trade Liberalization : Assessment of Alternative Scenarios," Trade Working Papers 23109, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:tradew:23109

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kym Anderson & Will Martin & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 2006. "Doha Merchandise Trade Reform: What Is at Stake for Developing Countries?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(2), pages 169-195.
    2. Ianchovichina, Elena & Robert McDougall, 2000. "Theoretical Structure of Dynamic GTAP," GTAP Technical Papers 480, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
    3. Sébastien Dessus & Kiichiro Fukasaku & Raed Safadi, 2001. "Multilateral Tariff Liberalisation and the Developing Countries," OECD Development Centre Policy Briefs 18, OECD Publishing.
    4. Kym Anderson & Ernesto Valenzuela, 2007. "Do Global Trade Distortions Still Harm Developing Country Farmers?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 143(1), pages 108-139, April.
    5. Mohamed Hedi Bchir & Sébastien Jean & David Laborde, 2006. "Binding Overhang and Tariff-Cutting Formulas," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(2), pages 207-232, July.
    6. Francois, Joseph & McDonald, Brad & Nordström, Håkan, 1996. "Trade Liberalization and Investment in a Multilateral Framework," CEPR Discussion Papers 1411, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Matthew Adler & Claire Brunel & Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Jeffrey J. Schott, 2009. "What’s on the Table? The Doha Round as of August 2009," Working Paper Series WP09-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    8. Francois, Joseph & Bradley McDonald, 1996. "Liberalization and Capital Accumulation in the GTAP Model," GTAP Technical Papers 310, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
    9. Warwick J. McKibbin & Adele Morris & Peter J. Wilcoxen & Yiyong Cai, 2009. "Consequences Of Alternative U.S. Cap-And-Trade Policies: Controlling Both Emissions And Costs," CAMA Working Papers 2009-18, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
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    More about this item


    DDA negotiations; CGE; Simulation;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation


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