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Sectoral inflation persistence, market concentration and imperfect common knowledge

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  • Ryo Kato
  • Tatsushi Okuda
  • Takayuki Tsuruga

Abstract

Previous studies have stressed that inflation dynamics exhibit a substantial dispersion across sectors. Using US producer price data, we present evidence that sectoral inflation persistence is negatively correlated with market concentration, which is difficult to reconcile with the prediction of the standard model of monopolistic competition. To explain the data, we incorporate imperfect common knowledge into the monopolistic competition model introduced by Melitz and Ottaviano (2008). In the model, strategic complementarity among firms increases as market concentration decreases. Because higher strategic complementarity generates greater inflation persistence, our model successfully replicates the observed negative correlation between inflation persistence and market concentration across sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryo Kato & Tatsushi Okuda & Takayuki Tsuruga, 2020. "Sectoral inflation persistence, market concentration and imperfect common knowledge," ISER Discussion Paper 1082, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:1082
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    File URL: https://www.iser.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/dp/2020/DP1082.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Crucini, Mario J. & Shintani, Mototsugu & Tsuruga, Takayuki, 2015. "Noisy information, distance and law of one price dynamics across US cities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 52-66.
    2. Joseph P. Byrne & Alexandros Kontonikas & Alberto Montagnoli, 2013. "International Evidence on the New Keynesian Phillips Curve Using Aggregate and Disaggregate Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(5), pages 913-932, August.
    3. Candian, Giacomo, 2019. "Information frictions and real exchange rate dynamics," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 189-205.
    4. Xavier Vives, 1990. "Trade Association Disclosure Rules, Incentives to Share Information, and Welfare," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 21(3), pages 409-430, Autumn.
    5. repec:mcb:jmoncb:v:45:y:2013:i::p:913-932 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Luengo-Prado, María José & Rao, Nikhil & Sheremirov, Viacheslav, 2018. "Sectoral inflation and the Phillips curve: What has changed since the Great Recession?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 63-68.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tatsushi Okuda & Tomohiro Tsuruga & Francesco Zanetti, 2021. "Imperfect information, heterogeneous demand shocks, and inflation dynamics," CAMA Working Papers 2021-29, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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