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COVID-19 Lockdown and Domestic Violence: Evidence from Internet-Search Behavior in 11 Countries

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  • Inés Berniell

    (CEDLAS-IIE-FCE-UNLP)

  • Gabriel Facchini

    (Department of Applied Economics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

Abstract

We study the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on domestic violence in 11 countries with different ex-ante incidence of domestic violence (DV) and lockdown intensity. We use a novel measure of DV incidents that allows us to make cross-country comparisons: a Google search intensity index of DV-related topics. Our difference-indifference estimates show an increase in DV search intensity after lockdown (31%), with larger effects as more people stayed at home (measured with Google Mobility Data). The peak of the increase in DV appears, on average, 7 weeks after the introduction of the lockdown. While we observe that the positive impacts on DV is a widespread phenomenon, the effect in developed countries is more than twice as strong as in Latin American countries. We show that the difference in impact correlates with the intensity of compliance with stay-at-home measures in the two groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Inés Berniell & Gabriel Facchini, 2020. "COVID-19 Lockdown and Domestic Violence: Evidence from Internet-Search Behavior in 11 Countries," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0273, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  • Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0273
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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