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Biotechnology as an alternative to chemical pesticides: a case study of Bt cotton in China

Author

Listed:
  • Jikun Huang

    (Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resource Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Ruifa Hu

    (Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resource Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Carl Pray

    (Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, Rutgers University)

  • Fangbin Qiao

    (Department of Agricultural Resources and Economics, University of California)

  • Scott Rozelle

    (Department of Agricultural Resources and Economics, University of California)

Abstract

The overall goal of this study is to determine the extent by which genetically engineered (GE) crops in China can lead to reductions of pesticide use, the nature and source of the reductions, and whether or not there are any non-pecuniary externalities. One of the first studies of the effect of plant biotechnology on poor farmers, the study is based on a data set collected by the authors in 2000 in North China. The paper¡¯s descriptive, budget and multivariate analysis find that Bt cotton significantly reduces the number of sprayings, the quantity of pesticides used and the level of pesticide expenditures. All Bt cotton varieties¡ªboth those produced by foreign life science companies and those created by China¡¯s research system are equally effective. In addition to these input-reducing effects, the paper also demonstrates that such reductions in pesticides also likely lead to labour savings, more efficient overall production, as well as positive health and environmental impacts.

Suggested Citation

  • Jikun Huang & Ruifa Hu & Carl Pray & Fangbin Qiao & Scott Rozelle, 2003. "Biotechnology as an alternative to chemical pesticides: a case study of Bt cotton in China," CEMA Working Papers 509, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cuf:wpaper:509
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jikun Huang & Fangbin Qiao & Linxiu Zhang & Scott Rozelle, 2000. "Farm Pesticide, Rice Production, and Human Health," EEPSEA Research Report rr2000051, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised May 2000.
    2. Albert Park & Scott Rozelle, 1998. "Reforming state-market relations in rural China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 6(2), pages 461-480, November.
    3. Widawsky, David & Rozelle, Scott & Jin, Songqing & Huang, Jikun, 1998. "Pesticide productivity, host-plant resistance and productivity in China," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 203-217, September.
    4. Fangbin Qiao & Jikun Huang & Linxiu Zhang & Scott Rozelle, 2012. "Pesticide use and farmers' health in China's rice production," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(4), pages 468-484, November.
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