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Fighting unemployment without worsening povety: Basic income versus reductions of social security contributions

  • Van der Linden, Bruno

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) ; Belgian National Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS))

Reductions of social security contributions (RSSC) and a basic income (BI) (or the related Negative Income Tax) are considered in a dynamic general equilibrium framework with imperfect competition on the labour market (the ‘wage-setting/price-setting’ model). The cases with homogeneous and heterogeneous workers are considered. It turns out that both policies have a long-run effect on the unemployment rate if they are appropriately designed. With two types of skills, this proposition holds if relative wages are rigid and if the supply of skills is not perfectly elastic. A welfare analysis shows that introducing appropriately framed RSSC or BI can be a Pareto improvement.

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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 1999028.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: 01 Nov 1998
Date of revision: 00 Oct 1999
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:1999028
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  1. Burda, Michael & Wyplosz, Charles, 1994. "Gross worker and job flows in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1287-1315, June.
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  7. L. F. M. Groot & H. M. M. Peeters, 1997. "A Model of Conditional and Unconditional Social Security in an Efficiency Wage Economy: The Economic Sustainability of a Basic Income," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 19(4), pages 573-597, July.
  8. Koskela, Erkki & Schob, Ronnie, 1999. "Does the composition of wage and payroll taxes matter under Nash bargaining?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 343-349, September.
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  14. Van der Linden, Bruno, 1999. "Active Citizen's Income, Unconditional Income and Participation under Imperfect Competition: A Normative Analysis," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 1999023, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
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  18. repec:adr:anecst:y:1999:i:53:p:01 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Picard, Pierre M & Toulemonde, Eric, 2001. "On the Equivalence of Taxes Paid by Employers and Employees," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(4), pages 461-70, September.
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