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Estimating Gender Differences in Access to Jobs : Females Trapped at the Bottom of the Ladder

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  • Laurent GOBILLON

    (Crest)

  • Dominique MEURS

    (Crest)

  • Sébastien ROUX

    (Crest)

Abstract

Firms are more productive on average in larger cities. Two explanations have been offered:agglomeration economies (larger cities promote interactions that increase productivity) and firmselection (larger cities toughen competition allowing only the most productive to survive). Todistinguish between them, we nest a generalised version of a seminal firm selection model and astandard model of agglomeration. Stronger selection in larger cities left-truncates the productivitydistribution whereas stronger agglomeration right-shifts and dilates the distribution. We assess therelative importance of agglomeration and firm selection using French establishment-level dataand a new quantile approach. Spatial productivity differences in France are mostly explained byagglomeration.

Suggested Citation

  • Laurent GOBILLON & Dominique MEURS & Sébastien ROUX, 2009. "Estimating Gender Differences in Access to Jobs : Females Trapped at the Bottom of the Ladder," Working Papers 2009-09, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2009-09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pierre‐Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon & Diego Puga & Sébastien Roux, 2012. "The Productivity Advantages of Large Cities: Distinguishing Agglomeration From Firm Selection," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(6), pages 2543-2594, November.
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    5. Dagsvik, John K, 1994. "Discrete and Continuous Choice, Max-Stable Processes, and Independence from Irrelevant Attributes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(5), pages 1179-1205, September.
    6. James Albrecht & Anders Bjorklund & Susan Vroman, 2003. "Is There a Glass Ceiling in Sweden?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 145-177, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Gobillon & Dominique Meurs & Sébastien Roux, 2015. "Estimating Gender Differences in Access to Jobs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 317-363.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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