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The Wage Distribution in a Model of the Assignment of Skills to Jobs

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  • Teulings, Coen N

Abstract

This paper discusses a general equilibrium model of the assignment of heterogeneous workers to heterogeneous jobs. Both jobs and workers are measured along a continuous one-dimensional scale. The composition of labor supply is represented by a distribution function. Highly skilled workers have an absolute advantage in all jobs and a comparative advantage in complex jobs. Equilibrium is characterized by a mapping of skills on complexities. The model is able simultaneously to explain the remuneration of skill, the allocation of skills to jobs, and variations in labor demand per job type. Estimation results for the Netherlands offer support for its relevance. Copyright 1995 by University of Chicago Press.

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  • Teulings, Coen N, 1995. "The Wage Distribution in a Model of the Assignment of Skills to Jobs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 280-315, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:103:y:1995:i:2:p:280-315
    DOI: 10.1086/261984
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Card, David & Lemieux, Thomas, 1996. "Wage dispersion, returns to skill, and black-white wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 319-361, October.
    5. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 1993. "Wage Dispersion, Returns to Skill, and Black-White Wage Differentials," Working Papers 691, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    6. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
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