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How Can South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa Gain from the Next WTO Round

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  • Anderson, Kym
  • Yao, Shunli

Abstract

If South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa are to become constructively engaged in the next attempt by World Trade Organization (WTO) members to liberalize trade multilaterally, they need to be convinced that there will be sufficient gains from trade reform to warrant the inevitable costs of negotiation and adjustment. This Paper provides new estimates of the likely economic effects on their economies of further liberalizing world trade post-Uruguay Round. The results show that the developing countries of South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa have much to gain from taking part in the next round. Those gains will be far greater the more those countries are willing to embrace reform at home so as to enable their firms to take greatest advantage of the opportunities provided by the opening up of markets abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Anderson, Kym & Yao, Shunli, 2002. "How Can South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa Gain from the Next WTO Round," CEPR Discussion Papers 3170, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3170
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anderson, Kym & Strutt, Anna, 1999. "Impact Of East Asia’s Growth Interruption and Policy Responses: The Case Of Indonesia," 1999 Conference (43th), January 20-22, 1999, Christchurch, New Zealand 125027, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. Harrison, W Jill & Pearson, K R, 1996. "Computing Solutions for Large General Equilibrium Models Using GEMPACK," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 83-127, May.
    3. Francois, Joseph F & Wooton, Ian, 2001. "Trade in International Transport Services: The Role of Competition," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 249-261, May.
    4. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
    5. Martin, W. & Winters, L.A., 1995. "The Uruguay Round and the Developing Countries," World Bank - Discussion Papers 307, World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kym Anderson, 2005. "Agricultural trade reform and poverty reduction in developing countries," Chapters,in: Trade Policy Reforms and Development, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Langhammer, Rolf J., 2004. "China and the G-21: a new North-South divide in the WTO after Cancún?," Kiel Working Papers 1194, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Anderson, Kym, 2003. "Trade Liberalization, Agriculture, and Poverty in Low-income Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 025, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Alemayehu Geda, 2006. "Openness, Inequality and Poverty in Africa," Working Papers 25, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    developing country gains; multilateral negotiations; trade policy; WTO;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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