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Merger or acquisition? An introduction to the Handbook of Historical economics

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  • Federico, Giovanni
  • Bisin, Alberto

Abstract

The relationship between history and economics as academic disciplines is methodologically subtle and sociologically contested. If the Cliometric revolution can be characterized as an acquisition of economics by history, the most recent trends in Historical Economics appear to turn this relationship on its head. In this Introduction we read the chapters of the Handbook as a forceful argument in favor of a merger between the two disciplines rather than the acquisition of one by the other; a merger which combines, notably, the detailed knowledge of historical sources, the capability of distilling complex historical processes into a model, and the statistical/econometric skills for identification and estimation.

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  • Federico, Giovanni & Bisin, Alberto, 2021. "Merger or acquisition? An introduction to the Handbook of Historical economics," CEPR Discussion Papers 15795, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:15795
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    3. A. Ricci & S. Scicchitano & M. Conti & G. Cardullo & G. Sulis, 2022. "On the Emergence of Cooperative Industrial and Labor Relations," Working Paper CRENoS 202201, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    4. Brownlow, Graham & Colvin, Christopher L., 2022. "Economic history and the future of pedagogy in economics," QUCEH Working Paper Series 22-09, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic history; Cliometrics; Persistence studies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General

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