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Civicness drain

Author

Listed:
  • Casari, Marco
  • Depaola, Maria
  • Ichino, Andrea
  • Marandola, Ginevra
  • Michaeli, Moti
  • Scoppa, Vincenzo

Abstract

Migration may cause not only a brain drain but also a civicness drain, leading to an uncivicness trap. We study this possibility using college choices of southern-Italian students classified as Civic if not cheating in a die-roll experiment. Local civicness is the fraction of Civic in their high-school class. A civicness drain is observed at high and low local civicness. We explain this finding in a model in which Civic and Uncivic types balance hope vs. fear of migration outcomes, taking into account economic gains, risk preferences, and their beliefs about being considered Civic in the place of destination.

Suggested Citation

  • Casari, Marco & Depaola, Maria & Ichino, Andrea & Marandola, Ginevra & Michaeli, Moti & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2018. "Civicness drain," CEPR Discussion Papers 13311, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13311
    as

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    Other versions of this item:

    • Casari, Marco & Ichino, Andrea & Michaeli, Moti & De Paola, Maria & Marandola, Ginevra & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2018. "Civicness Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 11955, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhixin Dai & Fabio Galeotti & Marie Claire Villeval, 2016. "Cheating in the Lab Predicts Fraud in the Field An Experiment in Public Transportations," Working Papers halshs-01265696, HAL.
    2. McIntosh, Steven & Vignoles, Anna, 2001. "Measuring and Assessing the Impact of Basic Skills on Labour Market Outcomes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 453-481, July.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Joseph-Simon Görlach, 2014. "Selective Outmigration and the Estimation of Immigrants' Earnings Profiles," CESifo Working Paper Series 4617, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Rosario Maria Ballatore & Margherita Fort & Andrea Ichino, 2018. "Tower of Babel in the Classroom: Immigrants and Natives in Italian Schools," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(4), pages 885-921.
    5. Maria Bigoni & Stefania Bortolotti & Marco Casari & Diego Gambetta & Francesca Pancotto, 2016. "Amoral Familism, Social Capital, or Trust? The Behavioural Foundations of the Italian North–South Divide," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(594), pages 1318-1341, August.
    6. Ferdinand M. Vieider & Mathieu Lefebvre & Ranoua Bouchouicha & Thorsten Chmura & Rustamdjan Hakimov & Michal Krawczyk & Peter Martinsson, 2015. "Common Components Of Risk And Uncertainty Attitudes Across Contexts And Domains: Evidence From 30 Countries," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 421-452, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Experiments; Honesty game; Italy; migration; social capital;

    JEL classification:

    • H - Public Economics
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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