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The Role of Technology in Mortgage Lending

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  • Fuster, Andreas
  • Plosser, Matthew
  • Schnabl, Philipp
  • Vickery, James

Abstract

Technology-based (``FinTech'') lenders increased their market share of U.S. mortgage lending from 2% to 8% from 2010 to 2016. Using market-wide, loan-level data on U.S. mortgage applications and originations, we show that FinTech lenders process mortgage applications about 20% faster than other lenders, even when controlling for detailed loan, borrower, and geographic observables. Faster processing does not come at the cost of higher defaults. FinTech lenders adjust supply more elastically than other lenders in response to exogenous mortgage demand shocks, thereby alleviating capacity constraints associated with traditional mortgage lending. In areas with more FinTech lending, borrowers refinance more, especially when it is in their interest to do so. We find no evidence that FinTech lenders target marginal borrowers. Our results suggest that technological innovation has improved the efficiency of financial intermediation in the U.S. mortgage market.

Suggested Citation

  • Fuster, Andreas & Plosser, Matthew & Schnabl, Philipp & Vickery, James, 2018. "The Role of Technology in Mortgage Lending," CEPR Discussion Papers 12961, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12961
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Intermediation; Fintech; Mortgages;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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