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Relative Performance, Banker Compensation, and Systemic Risk

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  • Albuquerque, Rui
  • Cabral, Luis
  • Guedes, Jose

Abstract

This paper shows that in the presence of correlated investment opportunities across banks, risk sharing between bank shareholders and bank managers leads to compensation contracts that include relative performance evaluation and to investment decisions that are biased toward such correlated opportunities, thus creating systemic risk. We analyze various policy recommendations regarding bank managerial pay and show that shareholders optimally undo the intended risk-reducing effects of the policies, demonstrating their ineffectiveness in curbing systemic risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Albuquerque, Rui & Cabral, Luis & Guedes, Jose, 2016. "Relative Performance, Banker Compensation, and Systemic Risk," CEPR Discussion Papers 11693, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11693
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fabienne Llense, 2010. "French CEOs' Compensations: What is the Cost of a Mandatory Upper Limit?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 56(2), pages 165-191, June.
    2. Barro, Jason R & Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Pay, Performance, and Turnover of Bank CEOs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 448-481, October.
    3. Acharya, Viral V., 2009. "A theory of systemic risk and design of prudential bank regulation," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 224-255, September.
    4. Patrick Bolton & Hamid Mehran & Joel Shapiro, 2015. "Executive Compensation and Risk Taking," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 19(6), pages 2139-2181.
    5. Allen, Franklin & Babus, Ana & Carletti, Elena, 2012. "Asset commonality, debt maturity and systemic risk," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 519-534.
    6. DeYoung, Robert & Peng, Emma Y. & Yan, Meng, 2013. "Executive Compensation and Business Policy Choices at U.S. Commercial Banks," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(01), pages 165-196, February.
    7. Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig, 2013. "The Bankers' New Clothes: What's Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9929.
    8. Chaigneau, Pierre, 2013. "Risk-shifting and the regulation of bank CEOs’ compensation," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 778-789.
    9. Kose John & Yiming Qian, 2003. "Incentive features in CEO compensation in the banking industry," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Apr, pages 109-121.
    10. Irina Barakova & Ajay Palvia, 2010. "Limits to relative performance evaluation: evidence from bank executive turnover," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 214-236, August.
    11. Doron Levit & Nadya Malenko, 2016. "The Labor Market for Directors and Externalities in Corporate Governance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(2), pages 775-808, April.
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