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Competition for advertisers and for viewers in media markets

Author

Listed:
  • Anderson, Simon P
  • Foros, Øystein
  • Kind, Hans Jarle

Abstract

Standard models of advertising-financed media assume consumers patronize a single media platform, precluding effective competition for advertisers. Such competition ensues if consumers multi-home. The principle of incremental pricing implies that multi-homing consumers are less valuable to platforms. Then entry of new platforms decreases ad prices, while a merger increases them, and ad-financed platforms may suffer if a public broadcaster carries ads. Platforms may bias content against multi-homing consumers, especially if consumers highly value overlapping content and/or second impressions have low value.

Suggested Citation

  • Anderson, Simon P & Foros, Øystein & Kind, Hans Jarle, 2015. "Competition for advertisers and for viewers in media markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 10608, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10608
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Attila Ambrus & Emilio Calvano & Markus Reisinger, 2016. "Either or Both Competition: A "Two-Sided" Theory of Advertising with Overlapping Viewerships," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(3), pages 189-222, August.
    2. Anderson, Simon P. & Foros, Øystein & Kind, Hans Jarle & Peitz, Martin, 2012. "Media market concentration, advertising levels, and ad prices," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 321-325.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Simon P. & Jullien, Bruno, 2016. "The advertising-financed business model in two-sided media markets," TSE Working Papers 16-632, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    2. Anderson, Simon P. & Peitz, Martin, 2015. "Media see-saws : winners and losers on media platforms," Working Papers 15-16, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.
    3. Belleflamme, Paul & Peitz, Martin, 2016. "Platforms and network effects," Working Papers 16-14, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    genre choice; incremental ad pricing; media bias; media economics; multi-homing; overlap;

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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