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The effects of home-ownership on labour mobility in the Netherlands: Oswald's theses revisited

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  • Michiel van Leuvensteijn
  • Pierre Koning

Abstract

This paper examines the hypotheses presented by Oswald (1999) for the Netherlands. These are: I) Home-owners are less likely to move than renters, II) Unemployed home-owners are less likely to move than unemployed renters, III) Owners of houses are less likely to move to another job, because they are not willing to leave the region and IV) Owners of houses are more likely to become unemployed. Using individual data of a panel of labour market and housing market histories for the period 1989-1998, we estimate a hazard rate model, that explain transitions on these markets. We find evidence for the Oswald theory in two cases: employed home-owners are less likely to move than renters are, and employed home-owners are less likely to change jobs than renters are. However, from these results alone we cannot conclude that employed workers that own a house have worse labour market positions than renters. Instead, their commitment to jobs makes them less vulnerable for unemployment. Also, Oswald's theory does not seem to hold for unemployed workers or nonparticipants. Instead, unemployed home-owners are even more inclined to move than renters.

Suggested Citation

  • Michiel van Leuvensteijn & Pierre Koning, 2000. "The effects of home-ownership on labour mobility in the Netherlands: Oswald's theses revisited," CPB Research Memorandum 173, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpb:resmem:173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heckman, James & Singer, Burton, 1984. "A Method for Minimizing the Impact of Distributional Assumptions in Econometric Models for Duration Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 271-320, March.
    2. Böheim, René & Taylor, Mark P., 2000. "From the dark end of the street to the bright side of the road? investigating the returns to residential mobility in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-38, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. van Ommeren, Jos & Rietveld, Piet & Nijkamp, Peter, 1997. "Commuting: In Search of Jobs and Residences," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 402-421, November.
    4. Henley, Andrew, 1998. "Residential Mobility, Housing Equity and the Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 414-427, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carole Brunet & Jean-Yves Lesueur, 2004. "Le statut résidentiel affecte-t-il la durée de chômage ?. Une estimation micro-économétrique sur données françaises," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 55(3), pages 569-578.
    2. Munch, Jakob Roland & Rosholm, Michael & Svarer, Michael, 2008. "Home ownership, job duration, and wages," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 130-145, January.
    3. Carole Brunet & Jean-Yves Lesueur, 2003. "Le Statut Résidentiel Affecte-t-il la Durée de Chômage ? Estimation microéconométrique de l'hypothèse d'Oswald sur données françaises," Post-Print halshs-00178544, HAL.
    4. Amanda C. Helderman & Maarten Van Ham & Clara H. Mulder, 2006. "Migration And Home Ownership," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 97(2), pages 111-125, April.
    5. Carole Brunet & Jean-Yves Lesueur, 2003. "Do homeowners stay unemployed longer ? A French micro-econometric study," Post-Print halshs-00178576, HAL.
    6. Rik de Boer & Rosamaria Bitetti, 2014. "A Revival of the Private Rental Sector of the Housing Market?: Lessons from Germany, Finland, the Czech Republic and the Netherlands," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1170, OECD Publishing.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis

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