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Heterogeneity in long term health outcomes of migrants within Italy

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  • Atella, Vincenzo
  • Deb, Partha
  • Kopinska, Joanna

Abstract

This article examines the long term physical and mental health effects of internal migration focusing on a relatively unique migration experience concentrated over a short period between 1950 and 1970 from the South to the North of Italy. We find a positive and statistically significant association between migration, its timing and physical health for migrant females, which we show are likely to represent rural females in both the early and the late cohort. We find less defined evidence of migration-health association for mental health. We link our findings to the economic transition and labor market transformation that Italy witnessed in that era. Male migrants were likely to be positively selected to migration, but harsh working conditions were likely to downplay this differential. On the contrary, women migrants, by and large, would not engage in the formal labor market avoiding the ill effects of working environments, at the same time benefiting from better living conditions and health care in the destination regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Atella, Vincenzo & Deb, Partha & Kopinska, Joanna, 2019. "Heterogeneity in long term health outcomes of migrants within Italy," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 19-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:63:y:2019:i:c:p:19-33
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.10.002
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 26th November 2018
      by Sam Watson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2018-11-26 12:00:19

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    Cited by:

    1. Atella, Vincenzo & Brugiavini, Agar & Pace, Noemi, 2015. "The health care system reform in China: Effects on out-of-pocket expenses and saving," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 182-195.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Physical health status; Mental health status; Migration decisions; Finite mixture models; Italy;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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