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Test of the 'healthy migrant hypothesis': A longitudinal analysis of health selectivity of internal migration in Indonesia

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  • Lu, Yao

Abstract

Previous studies show migrants are generally healthier than the populations in receiving societies, a result generally attributed to the positive selection of migrants on health. This hypothesis, however, has not been adequately evaluated due to lack of adequate data. In this article, using high-quality longitudinal data from Indonesia, the health selectivity hypothesis, also referred to as the healthy migrant hypothesis, is examined with respect to internal migration. Specifically, this study explores whether pre-migration health status affects the likelihood of migration by comparing those from the sending population who do and do not move. Results show that migrants in Indonesia tend to be selected with respect to health and that this selection is robust to household unobserved heterogeneity. However, the strength and direction of the health-migration association vary by types of migration and dimensions of health.

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  • Lu, Yao, 2008. "Test of the 'healthy migrant hypothesis': A longitudinal analysis of health selectivity of internal migration in Indonesia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(8), pages 1331-1339, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:8:p:1331-1339
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gregory Colman & Dhaval Dave, 2014. "Unemployment and Health Behaviors Over the Business Cycle: a Longitudinal View," NBER Working Papers 20748, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lankila, Tiina & Näyhä, Simo & Rautio, Arja & Koiranen, Markku & Rusanen, Jarmo & Taanila, Anja, 2013. "Health and well-being of movers in rural and urban areas – A grid-based analysis of northern Finland birth cohort 1966," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 169-178.
    3. Malmusi, Davide & Borrell, Carme & Benach, Joan, 2010. "Migration-related health inequalities: Showing the complex interactions between gender, social class and place of origin," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(9), pages 1610-1619, November.
    4. Yabiku, Scott T. & Agadjanian, Victor & Cau, Boaventura, 2012. "Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2530-2538.
    5. Lu, Yao & Qin, Lijian, 2014. "Healthy migrant and salmon bias hypotheses: A study of health and internal migration in China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 41-48.
    6. Vincenzo Atella & Partha Deb, 2013. "Heterogeneity in Long Term Health Outcomes of Migrants within Italy," NBER Working Papers 19422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hwang, Sean-Shong & Cao, Yue & Xi, Juan, 2010. "Project-induced migration and depression: A panel analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1765-1772, June.
    8. Christina Westphal, 2016. "Healthy Migrants? Health Selection of Internal Migrants in Germany," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(5), pages 703-730, December.
    9. repec:dem:demres:v:38:y:2018:i:14 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Lu, Yao, 2010. "Rural-urban migration and health: Evidence from longitudinal data in Indonesia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 412-419, February.
    11. Tinghög, Petter & Carstensen, John & Kaati, Gunnar & Edvinsson, Sören & Sjöström, Michael & Bygren, Lars Olov, 2011. "Migration and mortality trajectories: A study of individuals born in the rural community of Överkalix, Sweden," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(5), pages 744-751, September.
    12. Yuying Tong & Martin Piotrowski, 2012. "Migration and Health Selectivity in the Context of Internal Migration in China, 1997–2009," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(4), pages 497-543, August.
    13. repec:kap:poprpr:v:37:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11113-017-9456-y is not listed on IDEAS

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