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From the dark end of the street to the bright side of the road? investigating the returns to residential mobility in Britain

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  • Böheim, René
  • Taylor, Mark P.

Abstract

We examine the impact of moving home, the distance moved and reasons for moving on both household income and labour market earnings for a representative sample of individuals using panel data. Our results suggest that there are monetary returns to migration which apply to both household income and labour market earnings. However, not all migrants enjoy these returns, which depend on distance moved, family structure, and the employment situation of other family members. Further, returns to migration may not be enjoyed for some time after the move, emphasising the need for panel data in studies of residential mobility. Using data that are too recent relative to the time of migration will yield misleading results and underestimate the size of the premium attributable to residential mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Böheim, René & Taylor, Mark P., 2000. "From the dark end of the street to the bright side of the road? investigating the returns to residential mobility in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-38, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2000-38
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2000-38.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Raphael, Steven & Riker, David A., 1999. "Geographic Mobility, Race, and Wage Differentials," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 17-46, January.
    2. Borjas, George J. & Bronars, Stephen G. & Trejo, Stephen J., 1992. "Self-selection and internal migration in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 159-185, September.
    3. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    4. Hughes, Gordon & McCormick, Barry & McCormick, Barry, 1987. "Housing markets, unemployment and labour market flexibility in the UK," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 615-641, April.
    5. Evans, Philip & McCormick, Barry, 1994. "The New Pattern of Regional Unemployment: Causes and Policy Significance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 633-647, May.
    6. Jarvis, Sarah & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1998. "How Much Income Mobility Is There in Britain?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 428-443, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "Linking household survey and administrative record data: what should the matching variables be?," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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