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Health care expenditures, age, proximity to death and morbidity: implications for an ageing population

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Howdon

    (Centre for Health Economics and Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, UK.)

  • Nigel Rice

    (Centre for Health Economics and Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, UK.)

Abstract

This paper uses Hospital Episode Statistics, English administrative data, to investigate the growth in admitted patient health care expenditures and the implications of an ageing population. We use two samples of around 40,000 individuals who a) used inpatient health care in the financial year 2005/06 and died by 2011/12 and b) died in 2011/12 and had some hospital utilisation since 2005/06. We use a panel structure to follow individuals over seven years of this administrative data, containing estimates of inpatient health care expenditures (HCE), information regarding individuals’ age, time-to-death (TTD), morbidities at the time of an admission, as well as the hospital provider, year and season of admission. We show that HCE if principally determined by proximity to death rather than age, and that proximity to death is itself a proxy for morbidity.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Howdon & Nigel Rice, 2015. "Health care expenditures, age, proximity to death and morbidity: implications for an ageing population," Working Papers 107cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:107cherp
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    File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/che/documents/papers/researchpapers/CHERP107_health_care_expenditures_ageing_morbidity.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:socmed:v:184:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:hepoli:v:121:y:2017:i:8:p:923-928 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health care expenditures; ageing; time-to-death; morbidity;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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