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End-Of-Life Medical Spending In Last Twelve Months Of Life Is Lower Than Previously Reported

Author

Listed:
  • Eric French
  • Jeremy Mccauley
  • Maria Aragon
  • Pieter Bakx
  • Martin Chalkley

    () (Economic Studies - University of Dundee)

  • Stacey H. Chen
  • Bent J. Christensen
  • Hongwei Chuang
  • Aurelie Côté-Sergent
  • Mariacristina De Nardi
  • Elliott Fan
  • Damien Échevin
  • Pierre-Yves Geoffard

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Christelle Gastaldi-Ménager
  • Mette Gørtz
  • Yoko Ibuka
  • John B. Jones
  • Malene Kallestrup-Lamb
  • Martin Karlsson

    () (Örebro School of Public Affairs - Örebro University)

  • Tobias J. Klein
  • Grégoire De Lagasnerie
  • Pierre-Carl Michaud

    (RAND - RAND)

  • Owen O’donnell
  • Nigel Rice
  • Jonathan S. Skinner
  • Eddy Van Doorslaer
  • Nicolas R. Ziebarth

    (Cornell University)

  • Elaine Kelly

Abstract

Although end-of-life medical spending is often viewed as a major component of aggregate medical expenditure, accurate measures of this type of medical spending are scarce. We used detailed health care data for the period 2009–11 from Denmark, England, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Taiwan, the United States, and the Canadian province of Quebec to measure the composition and magnitude of medical spending in the three years before death. In all nine countries, medical spending at the end of life was high relative to spending at other ages. Spending during the last twelve months of life made up a modest share of aggregate spending, ranging from 8.5 percent in the United States to 11.2 percent in Taiwan, but spending in the last three calendar years of life reached 24.5 percent in Taiwan. This suggests that high aggregate medical spending is due not to last-ditch efforts to save lives but to spending on people with chronic conditions, which are associated with shorter life expectancies.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric French & Jeremy Mccauley & Maria Aragon & Pieter Bakx & Martin Chalkley & Stacey H. Chen & Bent J. Christensen & Hongwei Chuang & Aurelie Côté-Sergent & Mariacristina De Nardi & Elliott Fan & Dam, 2017. "End-Of-Life Medical Spending In Last Twelve Months Of Life Is Lower Than Previously Reported," Post-Print halshs-01631529, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01631529
    DOI: 10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0174
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01631529
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    Cited by:

    1. Howdon, Daniel & Rice, Nigel, 2018. "Health care expenditures, age, proximity to death and morbidity: Implications for an ageing population," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 60-74.
    2. Hintermann, Beat & Minke, Matthias, 2018. "The value of extending life at its end: Health care allocation in the presence of learning spillovers," Working papers 2018/15, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.

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