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Multilateral Environmental Agreements up to 2050: Are They Sustainable Enough?

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  • Christoph Jeßberger

Abstract

Today, reducing CO2 emissions is a global target which nearly all countries in the world prioritize. Some countries have ratified up to 30 multilateral environmental agreements regarding the atmosphere up to 2006. This number has been surging since 1989 after the ratification of the Montreal Protocol. Following the findings of the inverted U-shaped Environmental Kuznets Curve and applying a spline model, I can show the beneficial impact of the rising number of multilateral environmental agreements on the forecasts of CO2 emissions up to 2050. My results indicate that the number of atmosphere-related multilateral environmental agreements generates good will among global cooperation efforts towards reducing CO2 emissions and therefore provides a good basis for effective programs to stop climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Christoph Jeßberger, 2011. "Multilateral Environmental Agreements up to 2050: Are They Sustainable Enough?," ifo Working Paper Series 98, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_98
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/IfoWorkingPaper-98.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tilmann Rave & Frank Goetzke, 2013. "Climate-friendly technologies in the mobile air-conditioning sector: a patent citation analysis," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 15(4), pages 389-422, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; CO2 emissions; environmental agreements; forecasting; spline model;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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