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Singin' in the Rain: A Study of Social Pressure on the Soccer Field

  • Mikael Priks

Although social pressure may affect the behavior of individuals, it is very hard to evaluate empirically. A soccer field is an attractive testing ground in the sense that both performance and social pressure by spectators are measurable. The drawback is that the number of spectators is an endogenous variable. To solve this problem, I use pre-game precipitation as an instrument for the number of spectators at Swedish soccer games as it reduces attendance but not relative performance on the field. I find that organized home supporters manage to generate home wins. Highly skilled athletes are consequently influenced by social pressure, which can also help explain the well-known home field advantage.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2013/wp-cesifo-2013-11/cesifo1_wp4481.pdf
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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 4481.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4481
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  1. Armin Falk & Andrea Ichino, 2006. "Clean Evidence on Peer Effects," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(1), pages 39-58, January.
  2. Stefano DellaVigna & John A. List & Ulrike Malmendier, 2009. "Testing for Altruism and Social Pressure in Charitable Giving," NBER Working Papers 15629, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Paxson, Christina H, 1992. "Using Weather Variability to Estimate the Response of Savings to Transitory Income in Thailand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 15-33, March.
  4. Edward Miguel & Shanker Satyanath & Ernest Sergenti, 2004. "Economic Shocks and Civil Conflict: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(4), pages 725-753, August.
  5. repec:feb:framed:0087 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Pettersson-Lidbom, Per & Priks, Mikael, 2010. "Behavior under social pressure: Empty Italian stadiums and referee bias," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 212-214, August.
  7. Koning, Ruud H., 2003. "Home advantage in speed skating: evidence from individual data," Research Report 03F38, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
  8. Edward Miguel, 2005. "Poverty and Witch Killing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 1153-1172.
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