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Bank Loan Supply and Monetary Policy Transmission in Germany: An Assessment Based on Matching Impulse Responses

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  • Oliver Hülsewig
  • Eric Mayer
  • Timo Wollmershäuser

Abstract

This paper addresses the credit channel in Germany by using aggregate data. We present a stylized model of the banking firm in which banks decide on their loan supply in light of uncertainty about the future course of monetary policy. Applying a vector error correction model (VECM), we estimate the response of bank loans after a monetary policy shock taking into account the reaction of the output level and the loan rate. We estimate our model to characterize the response of bank loans by matching the theoretical impulse responses with the empirical impulse responses to a monetary policy shock. Evidence in support of the credit channel can be reported.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver Hülsewig & Eric Mayer & Timo Wollmershäuser, 2005. "Bank Loan Supply and Monetary Policy Transmission in Germany: An Assessment Based on Matching Impulse Responses," CESifo Working Paper Series 1380, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1380
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy transmission; credit channel; loan supply; loan demand; minimum distance estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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