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Fragile States and Development Policy

  • Timothy Besley
  • Torsten Persson

It is widely recognized that fragile states are key symptoms of under-development in many parts of the world. Such states are incapable of delivering basic services to their citizens and political violence is commonplace. As of yet, mainstream development economics has not dealt in any systematic way with such concerns and the implications for development assistance. This paper puts forward a frame-work for analyzing fragile states and applies it to a variety of development policies in different types of states.9076:

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File URL: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/eopp/eopp22.pdf
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Paper provided by Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE in its series STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series with number 022.

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Date of creation: Jan 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cep:stieop:022
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/default.asp

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  1. Svensson, Jakob, 1997. "When is foreign aid policy credible : aid dependence and conditionality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1740, The World Bank.
  2. Paul Collier & V. L. Elliott & HÃ¥vard Hegre & Anke Hoeffler & Marta Reynal-Querol & Nicholas Sambanis, 2003. "Breaking the Conflict Trap : Civil War and Development Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13938.
  3. Svensson, Jakob, 2003. "Why conditional aid does not work and what can be done about it?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 381-402, April.
  4. Lisa Chauvet & Paul Collier, 2006. "Helping Hand ? Aid to Failing States," Working Papers DT/2006/14, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  5. Bauer, P. T., 1975. "N.H. Stern on substance and method in development economics," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 387-405, December.
  6. Robert H. Bates, 2008. "The Logic of State Failure: Learning from Late-Century Africa," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 25(4), pages 297-314, September.
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