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My Precious! The Location and Diffusion of Scientific Research: Evidence from the Synchrotron Diamond Light Source

  • Christian Helmers
  • Henry Overman

We analyze the impact of the establishment of a GBP 380 million basic scientific research facility in the UK on the geographical distribution of related research. We investigate whether the siting of the Diamond Light Source, a 3rd generation synchrotron light source, in Oxfordshire induced a clustering of related research in its geographic proximity. To account for the potentially endogenous location choice of the synchrotron, we exploit the availability of a `runner-up' site near Manchester. We use both academic publications and patent data to trace the geographical distribution of related knowledge and innovation. Our results suggest that the siting of the synchrotron in Oxfordshire created a highly localized cluster of related scientific research.

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Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0131.

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Date of creation: Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0131
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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  1. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Miren Lafourcade, 2005. "Transport costs: measures, determinants, and regional policy implications for France," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 319-349, June.
  2. Michael Greenstone & Richard Hornbeck & Enrico Moretti, 2010. "Identifying Agglomeration Spillovers: Evidence from Winners and Losers of Large Plant Openings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 118(3), pages 536-598, 06.
  3. Christian Helmers & Mark Rogers, 2011. "Intellectual Property at the Firm-Level in the UK: The Oxford Firm-Level Intellectual Property Database," Economics Series Working Papers 546, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Shawn Kantor & Alexander Whalley, 2009. "Do Universities Generate Agglomeration Spillovers? Evidence from Endowment Value Shocks," NBER Working Papers 15299, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Peter Thompson & Melanie Fox Kean, 2004. "Patent Citations and the Geography of Knowledge Spillovers: A Reassessment," Working Papers 0401, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
  6. George J. Borjas & Kirk B. Doran, 2012. "Cognitive Mobility: Labor Market Responses to Supply Shocks in the Space of Ideas," NBER Working Papers 18614, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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