IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cep/sercdp/0107.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Ambition, Human Capital Acquisition and the Metropolitan Escalator

Author

Listed:
  • Ian Gordon

Abstract

This paper examines the relation between ambition, as a form of dynamic human capital, and the escalator role of high order metropolitan regions, as originally identified by Fielding (1989). It argues that occupational progression in such places particularly depends on concentrations both of people with more of this asset and of jobs offering preferential access to valued elements of tacit knowledge, interacting in thick, competitive labour markets. This is partially confirmed with analyses of BHPS data on long term progression showing that only the more ambitious gain from residence in the extended London region, and that they only progress faster there.

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Gordon, 2012. "Ambition, Human Capital Acquisition and the Metropolitan Escalator," SERC Discussion Papers 0107, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0107
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0107.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Storper & Anthony J. Venables, 2004. "Buzz: face-to-face contact and the urban economy," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 351-370, August.
    2. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 1995. "The Wage Curve," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026202375x, December.
    3. Wagner, Alfred, 1891. "Marshall's Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 5, pages 319-338.
    4. Christina Gathmann & Uta Schönberg, 2010. "How General Is Human Capital? A Task-Based Approach," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(1), pages 1-49, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. ., 2014. "Urban economic performance," Chapters, in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 2, pages 11-53, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Abenoza, Roberto F. & Cats, Oded & Susilo, Yusak O., 2017. "Travel satisfaction with public transport: Determinants, user classes, regional disparities and their evolution," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 64-84.
    3. Champion, Tony & Coombes, Mike & Gordon, Ian R., 2013. "How far do England’s second-order cities emulate London as human-capital ‘escalators’?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58447, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Ian R. Gordon, 2015. "Ambition, Human Capital Acquisition and the Metropolitan Escalator," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 1042-1055, June.
    2. Diemer, Andreas & Regan, Tanner, 2020. "No inventor is an island: social connectedness and the geography of knowledge flows in the US," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108500, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Justin Doran & Declan Jordan & Eoin O’Leary, 2012. "The effects of the frequency of spatially proximate and distant interaction on innovation by Irish SMEs," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(7-8), pages 705-727, September.
    4. Feldman, Maryann P. & Kogler, Dieter F., 2010. "Stylized Facts in the Geography of Innovation," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, in: Bronwyn H. Hall & Nathan Rosenberg (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 381-410, Elsevier.
    5. Sebastien Chantelot & Peres Stephanie & Virol Stephane, 2011. "From Talent to Creative City: Towards a conceptual framework," ERSA conference papers ersa11p373, European Regional Science Association.
    6. William R. Kerr & Frederic Robert-Nicoud, 2020. "Tech Clusters," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 50-76, Summer.
    7. Fitjar, Rune Dahl & Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés, 2013. "Firm collaboration and modes of innovation in Norway," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 128-138.
    8. Paul Verstraten, 2018. "The scope of the external return to higher education," CPB Discussion Paper 381.rdf, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    9. Scherrer Mendes, Philipe & Britto, Gustavo & Hermeto, Ana María, 2020. "Brazilian industry and knowledge absorption: internal and external company determinants," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    10. Jaison R. Abel & Ishita Dey & Todd M. Gabe, 2012. "Productivity And The Density Of Human Capital," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 562-586, October.
    11. Esteban Sanroma & Raul Ramos, 2007. "Local Human Capital and Productivity: An Analysis for the Spanish Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 349-359.
    12. Basco, Rodrigo & Suwala, Lech, 2021. "Spatial familiness and family spatialities—searching for fertile ground between family business and regional studies," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 7-32.
    13. Frank Lasch & Frank Robert & Frédéric Roy, 2013. "Regional determinants of ICT new firm formation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 671-686, April.
    14. Cook, Gary A.S. & Pandit, Naresh R. & Lööf, Hans & Johansson, Börje, 2012. "Geographic clustering and outward foreign direct investment," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 1112-1121.
    15. Fredin, Sabrina, 2013. "New Perspectives on Innovative Entrepreneurship and Path Dependence – A Regional Approach," Working Papers 2013/06, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Economics.
    16. Tao, Jin & Ho, Chun-Yu & Luo, Shougui & Sheng, Yue, 2019. "Agglomeration economies in creative industries," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 141-154.
    17. Beatrice Brunner & Andreas Kuhn, 2010. "The Impact of Labor Market Entry Condition on Initial Job Assignment, Human Capital Accumulation, and Wages," NRN working papers 2010-15, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    18. Paul Verstraten, 2018. "The scope of the external return to higher education," CPB Discussion Paper 381, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    19. Acosta, Camilo & Lyngemark, Ditte Håkonsson, 2019. "The Internal Spatial Organization of Firms: Evidence from Denmark," MPRA Paper 95283, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Daniel Felsenstein, 2015. "Factors Affecting Regional Productivity and Innovation in Israel: Some Empirical Evidence," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(9), pages 1457-1468, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Escalator region; migration; urban labour market; London; social mobility; human capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0107. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.