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The UK Intranational Trade Cycle

  • Michael Artis
  • Toshihiro Okubo

The paper uses annual data on real GDP for the UK regions and 12 manufacturing sectors toderive regional and regional/sectoral business cycles using an H-P filter. The cohesion of thecycles is examined via cross-correlations and comparisons made with the regional cycles forJapan, the United States and the EuroArea. The UK emerges as especially cohesive andefforts to explain the overall cross-correlations of regional GDP are not very successfulowing to the low variance of the explicand; when attention is turned to the sectoral/regionalcycles, with their greater variance it is possible to demonstrate that economic variables suchas distance, dissimilarity in structure and level of output play a significant role in explainingthe variance in the cross-correlations. A significant feature of the cross-correlations inrelation to those of EU countries is that whilst they continue to provide support for the "UKidiosyncrasy" they no longer do so as strongly as they did in earlier data samples

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Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0019.

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Date of creation: Apr 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0019
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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  1. Andrew B. Bernard & Steven N. Durlauf, 1994. "Interpreting Tests of the Convergence Hypothesis," NBER Technical Working Papers 0159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Artis, Michael J & Okubo, Toshihiro, 2008. "The Intranational Business Cycle: Evidence from Japan," CEPR Discussion Papers 6686, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Peter Pedroni & James Yudong Yao, 2005. "Regional Income Divergence in China," Department of Economics Working Papers 2005-03, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  4. Hess, Gregory D & Shin, Kwanho, 1997. "International and Intranational Business Cycles," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 93-109, Autumn.
  5. Mario Forni & Lucrezia Reichlin, 1998. "Let's get real: a factor analytical approach to disaggregated business cycle dynamics," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10147, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  6. Uhlig, H.F.H.V.S. & Ravn, M., 1997. "On Adjusting the H-P Filter for the Frequency of Observations," Discussion Paper 1997-50, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  7. Robert J. Hodrick & Edward Prescott, 1981. "Post-War U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Discussion Papers 451, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  8. Gregory D. Hess & Kwanho Shin, 1995. "Intranational business cycles in the United States," Research Working Paper 95-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  9. Wynne, Mark A & Koo, Jahyeong, 2000. "Business Cycles under Monetary Union: A Comparison of the EU and US," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(267), pages 347-74, August.
  10. S Barrios & M Brülhart & R J R Elliott & M Sensier, 2002. "A Tale of Two Cycles: Co-fluctuations Between UK Regions and the Euro Zone," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 03, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  11. Michael Artis, 2002. "Dating the Business Cycle in Britain," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 182(1), pages 90-95, October.
  12. M Artis, 2002. "Dating the Business Cycle in Britain," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 17, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  13. Burnside, Craig, 1998. "Detrending and business cycle facts: A comment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 513-532, May.
  14. Harvey, A C & Jaeger, A, 1993. "Detrending, Stylized Facts and the Business Cycle," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 231-47, July-Sept.
  15. Canova, Fabio, 1998. "Detrending and business cycle facts: A user's guide," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 533-540, May.
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