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Benchmarking Apprenticeship: UK and Continental Europe Compared

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  • Hilary Steedman

Abstract

This paper reviews the main characteristics of the provision, organization and financing of appprenticeship in a number of leading European countries - Austria, Denmark, France, Germany and the Netherlands. These are compared to current practice in Britain as exemplified by Modern Apprenticeship. The main areas examined are the statutory framework and standards; employment prospects; achieving the employer-apprentice match; prior school qualifications of apprentices and motivation to enter apprenticeship; the management and financing of apprenticeship. The paper concludes that apprenticeship in Britain, judged as a programme, falls short of the standards of that provided elsewhere in Europe on every important measure of good practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Hilary Steedman, 2001. "Benchmarking Apprenticeship: UK and Continental Europe Compared," CEP Discussion Papers dp0513, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0513
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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/DP0513.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini, 2003. "Nominal wage rigidity and the rate of inflation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(490), pages 762-781, October.
    2. Stephen Nickell & Luca Nunziata & Wolfgang Ochel & Glenda Quintini, 2001. "The Beveridge Curve, Unemployment and Wages in the OECD from the 1960s to the 1990s - Preliminary Version," CEP Discussion Papers dp0502, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Editors : & David Marsden & Hugh Stephenson, 2001. "Labour Law and Social Insurance in the New Economy: A Debate on the Supiot Report," CEP Discussion Papers dp0500, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Stephen Nickell & John Van Reenen, 2001. "Technological Innovation and Performance in the United Kingdom," CEP Discussion Papers dp0488, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giuseppe Bertola & Francine Blau & Lawrence Kahn, 2007. "Labor market institutions and demographic employment patterns," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 833-867, October.
    2. Josef Fersterer & Jörn-Steffen Pischke & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2008. "Returns to Apprenticeship Training in Austria: Evidence from Failed Firms," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 110(4), pages 733-753, December.
    3. Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian & Maier, Michael F., 2013. "Do employment subsidies reduce early apprenticeship dropout?," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-053, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. McIntosh, Steven, 2004. "The returns to apprenticeship training," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19981, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Rene Fahr & Uwe Sunde, 2009. "Gender differentials in skill use and skill formation in the aftermath of vocational training," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(9), pages 885-889.
    6. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Zwick, Thomas, 2009. "Why do firms train apprentices? The net cost puzzle reconsidered," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 631-637, December.
    7. Andrew Sharpe & James Gibson, 2005. "The Apprenticeship System in Canada: Trends and Issues," CSLS Research Reports 2005-04, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

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