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The Dynamics of Worker Reallocation Within and Across Industries

  • Amos Golan
  • Julia I. Lane
  • Erika McEntarfer

This paper uses an integrated employer-employee data set to answer two key questions: 1. What is the "equilibrium" amount of worker reallocation in the economy - both within and across industries? 2. How much does firm-level job reallocation affect the separation probabilities of workers? Consistent with other work, we find that there is a great deal of reallocation in the economy, although this varies substantially across demographic group. Much worker reallocation is within the economy, roughly evenly split between within and across broadly defined industries. An important new finding is that much of this reallocation is confined to a relatively small subset of workers that is shuffled across jobs - both within and across industries - in the economy. However, we also find that even for the most stable group of workers, firm level job reallocation substantially increases the probability of transition for even the most stable group of workers. Finally, workers who are employed in industries that provide low returns to tenure are much more likely to reallocate both within and across industries.

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File URL: ftp://ftp2.census.gov/ces/tp/tp-2005-02.pdf
File Function: First version, 2005
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau in its series Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers with number 2005-02.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cen:tpaper:2005-02
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  1. John Haltiwanger & C J Krizan & Lucia Foster, 1998. "Aggregate Productivity Growth: Lessons From Microeconomic Evidence," Working Papers 98-12, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Barbara Petrongolo & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Looking Into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," CEP Discussion Papers dp0470, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Haltiwanger, John C. & Lane, Julia I. & Spletzer, James R., 2007. "Wages, productivity, and the dynamic interaction of businesses and workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 575-602, June.
  4. Golan, Amos & Judge, George G. & Miller, Douglas, 1996. "Maximum Entropy Econometrics," Staff General Research Papers 1488, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  5. John M. Abowd & Paul A. Lengermann & Kevin L. McKinney, 2002. "The Measurement of Human Capital in the U.S. Economy," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2002-09, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau, revised Mar 2003.
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